Weekend Bird Notes, June 14, 2015

Beaver Brook Trail – Lost Lake

Lost Lake, Jefferson Twp., NJ, June 14, 2015 (iPhone photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Lost Lake, Jefferson Twp., NJ, June 14, 2015 (iPhone photo by Jonathan Klizas)

(Click on the photo for a larger image.)

A Beaver (Castor candensis) was one of the highlights during a birding hike this morning from Saffin Rock Rill at Mahlon Dickerson Reservation to the powerline south of Lost Lake along the rugged Beaver Brook Trail in the Rockaway River WMA.

A similar hike took place on almost the same date last year. That post is here.

Here is the Beaver swimming at the southern end of the lake .

Beaver, Lost Lake, Jefferson Twp. NJ, June 14, 2015 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Beaver, Lost Lake, Jefferson Twp. NJ, June 14, 2015 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

The Beaver swam back and forth for 20 minutes not far from this observer, repeatedly slapping its tail on the water before diving, as beavers do. Whether the slap was sounding an alarm at the presence of another mammal with binoculars and a camera slung over its shoulders, or simply playing, is up to the Beaver to decide.

Beaver, Lost Lake, Jefferson Twp. NJ, June 14, 2015 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Beaver, Lost Lake, Jefferson Twp. NJ, June 14, 2015 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

The Beaver dives under the water and forms the beginning of a spray of water.

Beaver, Lost Lake, Jefferson Twp. NJ, June 14, 2015 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Beaver, Lost Lake, Jefferson Twp. NJ, June 14, 2015 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

This motion creates an impressive volume of water to project into the air with a sound reminiscent of a Homo sapiens performing a cannonball at a swimming hole.

Beaver, Lost Lake, Jefferson Twp. NJ, June 14, 2015 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Beaver, Lost Lake, Jefferson Twp. NJ, June 14, 2015 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

A well-established Beaver lodge occupies the center of the lake. Sweet-scented Water Lily (Nymphaea odorata) covers a large portion of the water. Mountain Laurel, currently in peak bloom, lines the shore. With the 3,000 acres of Mahlon Dickerson Reservation adjacent to the 3,600 acres of the Rockaway River WMA where Lost Lake lies, this is as remote as it gets in Morris County.

Ovenbirds, Worm-eating Warblers, American Redstarts, Wood Thrushes, Veerys, Scarlet Tanagers are some of the many expected species found in this highlands habitat. The powerline cut holds only legitimate Blue-winged Warblers. Chestnut-sided, Prairie and Yellow Warblers are among the typical species found at this cut through the forest.

Least Flycatcher continues at Saffin Rock Rill but was not found in a Mountain Laurel stand in the WMA as it was last year. A Cerulean Warbler sang in the woods east of the the pond at Saffin Rock Rill.


Other Bird Notes

A Blue-headed Vireo was seen at the Black Spruce Bog area (labeled as Pine Swamp Trail on signs and maps) of Mahlon Dickerson Reservation this morning (Simon Lane). This species has been found through the years at this location along with other northern breeders such as Black-throated Blue Warbler and Hermit Thrush.


4 Common Ravens flew over a private residence near Veterans Park in Roxbury Twp. (Alan Boyd).


Saturday Bird Notes

A vocal Alder Flycatcher and a Cerulean Warbler continue at Tilcon Lake and Waterloo Valley Road respectively in Mt. Olive (Chris Thomas).


A Dickcissel was reported from Negri-Nepote Native Grassland Preserve on Saturday. No other sightings are reported yesterday and today despite people searching for it.

Also at Negri-Nepote Native Grassland Preserve yesterday is a well-described report of a Mississippi Kite seen flying towards S. Middlebush Rd. (Kirsten Abildskov, Piper Weldy).


These are just some of the reports for today. View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


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Bobolinks of Harding Township – June 11, 2015

Bobolink, Harding Twp., NJ, June 10, 2015 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Bobolink, Harding Twp., NJ, June 10, 2015 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

(Click on the photo for a larger image.)

One of the most interesting municipalities in New Jersey, or anywhere else, is Harding Township in southern Morris County. Harding separated from what was then called Passaic Township (now Long Hill) in 1922 in an effort to maintain the rural quality of the Harding area. This same energy of preservation continues throughout the 20th century and into the 21st.

Harding fact: How many townships in New Jersey can boast a National Wildlife Refuge (Great Swamp) and a National Historical Park (Morristown, a.k.a. Jockey Hollow) within its borders? In 1968 the Great Swamp became the first formally designated wilderness refuge in the United States after passage of the Wilderness Act of 1964. That is an impressive collection of attributes for one community of 20 square miles.

Since 1990, the Harding Land Trust has fostered a continuing conservation ethic in the township helping to save valuable habitats and preserve a bucolic quality of life quickly disappearing from the rest of the region.

Thanks to the foresight and generosity of the venerable Frelinghuysen family, vast acreage was donated to and acquired by the Harding Land Trust creating an area along James Street known as Frelinghuysen Fields and Frelinghuysen Marsh. As a New Jersey congressman representing Morris and Somerset counties from 1953-1975 and a Harding resident, Peter H.B. Frelinghuysen II (1916-2011) was instrumental in stopping the Port Authority’s misguided plan in the 1950′ s and 60’s to turn the Great Swamp into an airport. A National Wildlife Refuge was created instead. Today, his son, Rodney, continues the family legacy of public service as a congressman in the same district.

The main breeding species at Frelinghuysen Fields is Red-winged Blackbird. Bobolinks are annual. At least 8 males were seen recently on both sides of James Street. Eastern Meadowlarks do not currently breed here but were present as fall migrants in 2014. Grasshopper Sparrow has an historical presence thirty years ago but probably has not been here in decades. The field is cut for hay but not until late July or later after birds have fledged.

Red-winged Blackbird, Harding Twp., NJ, June 10, 2015 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Red-winged Blackbird, Harding Twp., NJ, June 10, 2015 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Margetts Field, nearby on Blue Mill Road, the property which helped launch the founding of the Harding Land Trust, has nesting Bobolinks in small numbers. Frelinghuysen and Margetts Fields are two of the very few remaining areas of suitable habitat for this species in Morris County.

Both Frelinghuysen and Margetts Fields also have excellent butterfly habitat with large patches of milkweed, dogbane and other nectaring sources in spring and summer.

Margetts Field, Harding Twp., NJ, June 10, 2015 (iPhone photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Margetts Field, Harding Twp., NJ, June 10, 2015 (iPhone photo by Jonathan Klizas)


Harding Township Resources:



View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


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Pine Siskin; mocosocoBirds Milestone – June 9, 2015

Pine Siskin in Morris Township

The following photos are blurry, partly due to shooting through an old screen door in shaded light.

Pine Siskin, Morris Twp., NJ, June 9, 2015 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Pine Siskin, Morris Twp., NJ, June 9, 2015 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

This lone Pine Siskin has visited a thistle sock on Kemble Mountain in Morris Township for at least the past two days. Pine Siskins were daily visitors at this feeder for three months during the past winter/early spring, last seen on May 13.

Pine Siskin with House Finch, Morris Twp., NJ, June 9, 2015 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Pine Siskin with House Finch, Morris Twp., NJ, June 9, 2015 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

This joins a recent report of a male/female pair at a private residence in Bernards Twp. This is not surprising considering the influx of Pine Siskins in certain locations this past winter.

The one known confirmed historical breeding record in Morris County, according to the Birds of New Jersey by J. Walsh, V. Elia, R. Kane and T. Halliwell (N.J. Audubon Society, 1999), is in May 1988 from Budd Lake with an adult feeding three fledglings. 35 birds were banded in breeding condition at the same time. The only confirmed nesting attempt during the time period of the NJ Breeding Bird Atlas of the 1990s is a nest built in July of 1995 at Green Pond in Morris County, but later abandoned.

In The Birds of New Jersey: Status and Distribution, by William J. Boyle, Jr., Kevin T. Karlson, photographic editor, Princeton University Press, 2011, mention is made of “multiple reports of nesting and juvenile birds” in 2009, following a big winter incursion, but specific locations are not mentioned and no records appear in the eBird database.


mocosocoBirds Milestone

mocosocoBird’s inaugural post was March 3, 2011. Approximately eight subscribers received that post. In recent days, the number of subscribers and followers has passed the 1,000 mark with the total amassed from email and WordPress subscribers, along with Twitter, Facebook and Tumblr followers.

Thank you, everyone!


Finis


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Blue Grosbeak, St. Virgil’s Ravens – June 7, 2015

Blue Grosbeak, Lake Denmark, NJ, June 7, 2015 (documentation photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Blue Grosbeak, Lake Denmark, NJ, June 7, 2015
(documentation photo by Jonathan Klizas)

The poor quality photo above is of an immature male Blue Grosbeak found this morning in the wilds of Lake Denmark, Rockaway Twp. This is the only Blue Grosbeak reported from Morris County so far in 2015. A sample of the Blue Grosbeak’s song from this morning can be heard here.

Other species around the lake are Black-billed and Yellow-billed Cuckoos, Ovenbirds, Worm-eating Warbler, Northern Waterthrush, Chestnut-sided Warbler, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, etc.

Tim Vogel adds Least Flycatcher and Bald Eagle to the list from Saturday, June 7.

Lake Denmark is encompassed by the U.S. Military’s Picatinny Arsenal. Most of the 6,400 acres of Picatinny are off limits to the public. When an area is proudly advertised as “the Joint Center of Excellence for Armaments and Munitions” it is probably a good idea to heed any warnings to KEEP OUT.

However, Lake Denmark Road is public and an excellent birding location in the spring. Certain parts of Lake Denmark are accessible to the public as well. In general, it is mocosocoBirds policy to treat Lake Denmark as a you-are-on-your-own location and not divulge birding-site specifics.


St. Virgil’s Ravens

A lone, tall Norway Spruce stands in the front of St. Virgil’s Parish at the southwest corner of Speedwell Avenue (Rt. 202) and West Hanover Avenue in Morris Township (West Hanover Ave. is the border between Morris Plains to the north and Morris Township to the south).

For anyone who has waited for the red light to change at this busy intersection, you may have noticed Black and/or Turkey Vultures roosting in that spruce tree. You may have also heard the croaking calls of Common Ravens emanating from said tree – up to four to be exact. Where these Ravens live or nest is uncertain, but they have inhabited the Morris Plains-Morris Township-Cedar Knolls area for at least 4 years.

These Ravens were especially regular at the Shop-Rite construction site at Horsehill Rd. and W. Hanover Ave. in 2013 which Chuck Hantis photo-documented. Those photographs can be seen here.

After going unreported for a long period, the Ravens have made the eBird database yet again. They were heard on Saturday, June 6 in their usual location (Daniel Nowak via eBird).


Other Field Notes

From Louis Bizzarro today at Mahlon Dickerson Reservation:
“I’m happy to say a Cerulean Warbler is still present near Saffin Pond. At around 9:30 A.M. he was singing less than 20 yards east of the trail. It’s great to see this vulnerable species thrive and expand through New Jersey.”

“Other highlights included three Acadian Flycatchers (one was off of Ogden trail, two near Pine Swamp), four Least Flycatchers (Two near Saffin pond, two off of Ogden trail), a flock of four Ravens next to the baseball field (along with a black bear!), and twelve warbler species including a Canada, Hooded, and three Northern Waterthrushes at Pine Swamp. Also at Pine Swamp was a singing Purple Finch, which was a nice surprise.”


From Bob Auster:
“At Negri-Nepote Native Grassland Preserve today I observed a pair of Blue Grosbeaks on the main trail shortly past the pond. Also there was a Yellow-breasted Chat on the trail that runs on the east side of the power lines, south of the farm and about 50 yards after the trail forks away from the power lines. The Ring-necked Pheasant previously reported by others was also heard well from this same location.”

[Editor’s Note: Apologies for bearing bad news for listers, but recent (as in the past year) information has come to the fore that any Ring-necked Pheasant observations in the Negri area, and anywhere in Morris and Somerset Counties for that matter, are of released birds and should not be taken seriously.]


Waterloo Valley Road in Mt. Olive Twp. has Cerulean Warbler (annual), Acadian Flycatcher, Alder Flycatcher and 5 Bank Swallows at the colony (Simon Lane).

Bank Swallow, Mt. Olive Twp., NJ, June 7, 2015 (photo by Simon Lane)

Bank Swallow, Mt. Olive Twp., NJ, June 7, 2015 (photo by Simon Lane)

(Click on the photo for a larger image.)

If attempting to view this small, but annual, Bank Swallow colony, be aware that the bank is shared with Northern Rough-winged Swallows. There are lots of little brown swallows flying about.


The Killdeer Family at Melanie Lane Wetlands – photo by Chuck Hantis.

Killdeer, Melanie Lane Wetlands, Hanover, NJ, June 6, 2015 (photo by Chuck Hantis)

Killdeer, Melanie Lane Wetlands, Hanover, NJ, June 6, 2015 (photo by Chuck Hantis)

(Click on the photo for a larger image.)


These are just some of the reports for today. View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


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Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, Saturday Bird Notes, June 6, 2015

Thank you to any who expressed concern due to the lack of mocosocoBirds posts this past week. Besides yours truly simply taking a short break to recharge, there simply was nothing of note to write about. The spring migration of 2015 that wasn’t has left us with a June swoon of people birding the same old places and finding the same old species.

Speaking of spring migration, the Office of the New Jersey State Climatologist at Rutgers University published the monthly temperature and precipitation charts for May and the preceding twelve months.

The precipitation chart is below. As one can see, May 2015 was the third driest on record going back to 1895:
nj_12month_pcp_dep

If you correctly thought the winter months of 2015 in New Jersey were brutally cold, May 2015 partially made up for it. It was the third warmest May since 1895.
nj_12month_temp_dep


Yellow-bellied Sapsucker in Pequannock Township

There are no breeding records for Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (YBSA) in Morris County. It is only since the 1990s that YBSA is an established breeder in New Jersey at all, with records from Sussex County. Is the Yellow-bellied Sapsucker found today at Mountainside Park by Dan Brill another late victim of the spring of 2015? Or a wandering individual looking for new territory to establish?


Nightjars at Split Rock

Last evening, Split Rock Reservoir played host to two interesting species of the twilight, a Common Nighthawk, which hunted insects for 20 minutes directly in front of this viewer, and an Eastern Whip-poor-will, which called in the area of the refurbished dam.


These are just some of the reports for today. View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


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Bonaparte’s Gull, Monday Bird Notes, June 1, 2015

Bonaparte's Gull, Lake Musconetcong, NJ, June 1, 2015 (photo by Alan Boyd)

Bonaparte’s Gull, Lake Musconetcong, NJ, June 1, 2015 (photo by Alan Boyd)

The only storm related bird of note today in the mocosocoBirds region is a Bonaparte’s Gull at Lake Musconetcong (Alan Boyd). This is a rare find for this time of the year at an inland location. In fact, the eBird Range Map applet shows none for inland New Jersey in the month of June of any year. The closest is a record from Saw Mill Creek in the New Jersey Meadowlands…today, June 1, 2015.


Other Field Notes

A private residence in Bernardsville has a continuing male and female Pine Siskin.


Horned Larks are in Hillsborough and Montgomery Townships with singletons found on a farmfield on River Rd., Hillsborough, Opie Road and at Selody Sod Farm in Montgomery Twp. (Jeff Ellerbusch).


An interesting find today was a flyover Gadwall at Negri-Nepote Native Grassland Preserve (Megan Crewe via eBird).


These are just some of the reports for today. View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


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Sunday Bird Notes, May 31, 2015

Yellow-breasted Chat at Lord Stirling Park

Yellow-breasted Chat, Lord Stirling Park, NJ, May 30, 2015 (photo by Chris Thomas)

Yellow-breasted Chat, Lord Stirling Park, NJ, May 30, 2015 (photo by Chris Thomas)

(Click on the photo for a larger image.)

As Chris Thomas shows in the above photograph from yesterday and Stuart and Wendy Malmid found out today, the Yellow-breasted Chat continues at Lord Stirling Park. This is the second consecutive year for a Chat at the Bullfrog Pond location.


Other Field Notes

Birds along the Somerset County portion of Black River Road going into Lamington include Black-billed Cuckoo, American Kestrel, Bobolinks and Eastern Meadowlarks (Jeff Ellerbusch).


One species that is missing this year from the Morris and Somerset area is Red-headed Woodpecker. A few were seen earlier in May at Glenhurst Meadows along the Passaic River, but none were seen or heard on the Long Hill Wetlands side of the river today and have not been reported for two weeks despite regular coverage by birders on the Glenhurst Meadows side of the river.

The Long Hill Wetlands are frequently flooded, or at least wet, with a series of ditches filled with varying levels of water. The ditches are currently no more than moist mud. Mosquitos and Poison Ivy abound – and also a Great Egret hanging out in a tree overhanging the Passaic River as seen in the photo below.

Great Egret, Passaic River, Long Hill Twp., NJ, May 31, 2015 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Great Egret, Passaic River, Long Hill Twp., NJ, May 31, 2015 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Another missing species is White-eyed Vireo, at least from the Washington Valley area in Morris Twp. Regular at two locations the past few years, none have appeared in 2015.


These are just some of the reports for today. View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


Posted in Morris County, Somerset County | Tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Jockey Hollow, Saturday Bird Notes, May 30, 2015

Jockey Hollow

Primrose Brook, Morristown National Historical Park (Jockey Hollow), NJ, May 30, 2015 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Primrose Brook, Morristown National Historical Park (Jockey Hollow), NJ, May 30, 2015 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

2015 is the 10th year of the National Park Service Landbird Monitoring Program administered by the Vermont Center for Ecostudies.

Morristown National Historical Park, commonly known as Jockey Hollow, is the southern most park of this study. The southeastern part of the park was censused this morning. The count consists of a 10 point survey with the observer spending 10 minutes at each point. This particular route, labeled Primrose Brook, contains one section requiring a bushwhack through some dense Japanese Barberry as well as climbing over and around numerous trees felled by Hurricane Sandy in 2012. Other than that, it is a walk in the park, albeit usually not on established trails. The photo below shows a tag that helps to guide the observer around the route.

Bird Study Marker, Jockey Hollow, NJ (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Bird Study Marker, Jockey Hollow, NJ (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Bird species were typical with Hooded Warblers, Louisiana Waterthrushes, Pileated Woodpecker, Scarlet Tanagers, Yellow-billed Cuckoos and numerous Ovenbirds, Wood Thrushes, Veerys, etc. A late migrating Swainson’s Thrush was an unexpected surprise.

An Acadian Flycatcher called at the intersection of Patriots Path and the Camp Trail where it crosses Primrose Brook. This species was regular in the park thirty years ago but has become scarce in recent decades.


Other Field Notes

Many observers reported a pair of Blue Grosbeaks in a field near the Orientation Center at Duke Farms yesterday, May 29.


A Cerulean Warbler was found along the Righter Mine Trail, Rockaway Twp. yesterday (David Bernstein).


These are just some of the reports for today. View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


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Thursday Bird Notes, May 28, 2015

Lark Sparrow in Florham Park

A well-described Lark Sparrow was reported at Florham Park Fields yesterday afternoon (Dominic Garcia-Hall). The Lark Sparrow was not relocated today despite several observers looking at different times during the day.

Only two other second and third-hand records are known for this species in Morris County. This is an unusual date for Lark Sparrow in New Jersey as most occur in the autumn. Interestingly, a well-documented and photographed Lark Sparrow was observed in Brooklyn on May 23-24 of this year.

It is previously mentioned in this space that numerous No Trespassing signs have appeared on the Florham Park Fields property since last year. See below:

N. Rough-winged Swallow, Florham Park, May 17, 2015 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

N. Rough-winged Swallow, Florham Park, May 17, 2015 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)


Hybrid Warblers continue at Glenhurst Meadows

"Lawrence's" Warbler, Glenhurst Meadows, NJ, May 28, 2015 (photo by Robert Gallucci)

“Lawrence’s” Warbler, Glenhurst Meadows, NJ, May 28, 2015 (photo by Robert Gallucci)

A “Lawrence’s” Warbler (Blue-winged, or “Brewster’s”, x Golden-winged Warbler hybrid) was seen again at Glenhurst Meadows (Robert Gallucci). A continuing “Brewster’s” Warbler was also found.


These are just some of the reports for today. View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


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A season at an end?, May 26, 2015

An Acadian Flycatcher was a highlight in the Great Swamp NWR yesterday, May 25. Other than that and a flurry of Mourning Warblers at Lord Stirling Park on Saturday, May 24, spring migration has petered out in Morris and Somerset Counties. Frankly, it was not much to begin with. Yes, breeders are in many of their usual locations, but by all accounts, this is the poorest spring with regards to variety and number of migrants that many observers remember.

Northern Rough-winged Swallow, Hanover, NJ, May 25, 2015 (photo by Chuck Hantis)

Northern Rough-winged Swallow, Hanover, NJ, May 25, 2015 (photo by Chuck Hantis)

Eastern Kingbird, Florham Park, NJ, May 25, 2015 (photo by Chuck Hantis)

Eastern Kingbird, Florham Park, NJ, May 25, 2015 (photo by Chuck Hantis)


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


Posted in Morris County, Somerset County | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment