Rock Wren continues in Somerset Co. – Dec. 27, 2016

Rock Wren, Franklin Twp., Somerset Co., NJ, Dec. 27, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Rock Wren, Franklin Twp., Somerset Co., NJ, Dec. 27, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

(Click on the photo for a larger image.)

The Rock Wren found Dec. 25 by Cliff Miller continues, today Dec. 27, at an active construction site in Franklin Township. This is right around the corner from the most typical Sandhill Crane locations. Cliff gives an account of why he was where he was when he found the Rock Wren at the JerseyBirds archive, here.

Well over fifty eBird checklists have already been entered for the wren. Who knows how many non-eBirders have seen it as well. Remember, use the stakeout Rock Wren, Rutgers Blvd, Franklin Township (2016) hotspot when entering the Rock Wren on eBird. This is to reduce the clutter on the species maps and other data reports. Please, look for a hotspot first before entering a checklist.

A general map of the Rock Wren area is here. The Google earth map does not include the buildings under construction or the roads the Rock Wren is frequenting.

Sam Galick created a NJ Rarities map which can be viewed here. This also includes the Rock Wren location.

The Wren was seen this morning working the curb in a southerly direction along Goshen Road. It hopped over Goshen to a dirt mound area along Hooper Rd. It then crossed Mento Way and spent a good amount of time among the lumber and other construction debris at the west end of Hooper Rd. It eventually crossed the pond and worked the curb along Rutgers Blvd. before returning to the mud mounds along Mento Way.

In other words, it moves around a lot and almost never stays still.

Rock Wren, Franklin Twp., Somerset Co., NJ, Dec. 27, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Rock Wren, Franklin Twp., Somerset Co., NJ, Dec. 27, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

The construction workers are tolerant of birders, so far. Please stay on the roadways, stay out of the way of construction vehicles, be respectful and smile a lot.

Rock Wren, Franklin Twp., Somerset Co., NJ, Dec. 27, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Rock Wren, Franklin Twp., Somerset Co., NJ, Dec. 27, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Rock Wren, Franklin Twp., Somerset Co., NJ, Dec. 27, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Rock Wren, Franklin Twp., Somerset Co., NJ, Dec. 27, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)


Cackling Geese in Morris

Rob Fanning found a pair of Cackling Geese among the Canada Geese this morning at Kitchell Pond at Loantaka Brook Reservation. The pattern of geese on this body of water is that they usually leave sometime by mid-morning.


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


Posted in Morris County, Somerset County | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Rock Wren in Somerset County – Dec. 26, 2016

Rock Wren, Franklin Twp., NJ, Dec. 26, 2016 (photo by Ben Barkley)

Rock Wren, Franklin Twp., NJ, Dec. 26, 2016 (photo by Ben Barkley)

Somerset County is exiting 2016 spectacularly as two western vagrants have visited the county in the past two weeks of December – both first records for the county. The first was the Townsend’s Warbler at Duke Farms on Dec. 12 and 13, and the second – yesterday and today, an even more remarkable Rock Wren in Franklin Township.

Cliff Miller discovered this extreme rarity in New Jersey on Dec. 25. Cliff’s account of his finding may be read at the archives of JerseyBirds here.

Many observers were able to view it today, Dec. 26. This represents the second record of Rock Wren in the state if accepted by the New Jersey Bird Record Committee. The first state record occurred in Cape May from Dec. 2, 1992 – Mar. 28, 1993. A brief account of the Cape May sighting is here.

A Google map of the Rock Wren’s location is here. This is a construction site. Please stay out of the actual construction zone to avoid conflicts.

David Weber created an eBird hotspot for the Rock Wren’s location. eBird users are asked to use this hotspot to mark the location of the Rock Wren when they submit records. The hotspot may be viewed here.


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


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Townsend’s Warbler continues at Duke Farms – Dec. 13, 2016

Jeff Ellerbusch reports the Townsend’s Warbler continues today, Dec. 13, in the same location as yesterday at Duke Farms. See the following link for details:

Townsend’s Warbler at Duke Farms

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Townsend’s Warbler in Somerset County – Dec. 12, 2016

Townsend's Warbler, Duke Farms, Somerset Co., NJ, Dec. 12, 2016 (Photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Townsend’s Warbler, Duke Farms, Somerset Co., NJ, Dec. 12, 2016 (Photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Bruce McWhorter found Somerset County’s first record of Townsend’s Warbler (TOWA) this morning at Duke Farms, Hillsborough Township. The TOWA continued to be seen by many observers throughout the day, although much time and patience was necessary.

The following link is a map created by Jeff Ellerbusch which gives an accurate location of where the TOWA was seen in the late morning and afternoon: Townsend’s Warbler location at Duke Farms. Be aware that the TOWA was also seen in the parking lot of the Orientation Center in the morning and at other locations in the general area.

Duke Farms is closed on Wednesdays.

An Orange-crowned Warbler, Baltimore Oriole, Red-breasted Nuthatch and Merlin as well as many other local species are also in the immediate area. The eBird reviewer for Somerset County asks that all Chickadees be listed as Carolina/Black-capped. Do not attempt to narrow them to exact species. This area is part of the epicenter of Chickadee identification confusion.


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


Posted in Morris County, Somerset County | Tagged , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Tundra Swans, Red-necked Grebe – Dec. 10, 2016

Tundra Swans and Red-necked Grebe at Lake Hopatcong

Tundra Swans, Lake Hopatcong, Morris Co., NJ, Dec. 10, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Tundra Swans, Lake Hopatcong, Morris Co., NJ, Dec. 10, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Tundra Swans have returned to Lake Hopatcong. Local bird observers have come to know this as an annual wintering location for this species. The swans may be found in varying numbers during the waterfowl season as long as the lake is not entirely frozen.

Today’s location was the Lake Forest area at the north end of the lake in Morris County – north of Brady Road Bridge. The Tundra Swans were not alone. 238 Mute Swans were tallied throughout the entirety of the lake with most of them north of Brady Road Bridge between the Lake Forest Yacht Club and the marina on Rt. 181. This represents the highest count ever of Mute Swans in one location of Morris County in the age of eBird. The previous high count was 185 at Mt. Hope Lake in 2013.

The swans will not be at Lake Forest for long. Much, if not most, of the lake north of Brady Road Bridge is already frozen. More than likely, that section will be entirely frozen by next weekend. This means the swans can relocate anywhere on New Jersey’s largest lake.

Exercise care in identifying black-billed swans in New Jersey. Trumpeter Swan is now an accepted species in New Jersey, meaning it is a review species for the New Jersey Bird Record Committee. One Trumpeter Swan record from this past winter and spring is accepted as valid for Sussex and Morris Counties. David Sibley has an online guide for separating Tundra and Trumpeter Swans. The link is here.

Culver’s Lake in Sussex County has the reputation for being the coldest spot in New Jersey. This observer’s contention is that Lake Hopatcong is not far behind!

A Red-Necked Grebe was found west of Nolans Point and was closer to Elba Point and Davis Cove on the Sussex County side of the lake. It was too distant, and too cold, for a documentation photo.

Three Common Loons were in Great Cove and Van Every Cove. Hundreds of Herring and Ring-billed Gulls were scattered throughout the lake. The densest clusters were in the northern section of the lake.


Other birds

The female Surf Scoter of Kenvil Lake continues as of today. She was resting with the Ruddy Ducks and Lesser Scaup in the southern part of the lake late this morning. The following photo of Alan Boyd’s is from Thursday, Dec. 8.

Surf Scoter, Kenvil Lake, Morris Co., NJ, Dec. 8, 2016 (photo by Alan Boyd)

Surf Scoter, Kenvil Lake, Morris Co., NJ, Dec. 8, 2016 (photo by Alan Boyd)


The Franklin Township Sandhill Cranes, 7 in number so far, are favoring the corn fields of Mettlers and Weston Roads, north of Colonial Park as of Dec. 8 (Jeff Ellerbusch, m.obs.).


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


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Surf Scoter in Morris; Christmas Bird Count Dates – Dec. 6, 2016

Surf Scoter, Kenvil Lake, Roxbury Twp., NJ, Dec. 5, 2016 (photo by Alan Boyd)

Surf Scoter, Kenvil Lake, Roxbury Twp., NJ, Dec. 5, 2016 (photo by Alan Boyd)

Alan Boyd found a female Surf Scoter Monday, December 5 at Kenvil Lake. The scoter continues as of dusk, Tuesday, December 6 and has been seen by a handful of observers.

An earlier post about this peculiar location is here.

Reports of this species in the Morris County area are slightly increasing over the past five years due to greater coverage. “Slightly increasing” is defined as any reports at all in the past few years after many years of no reports.

Somerset had its first county record of Surf Scoter on October 26 of this year. White-winged Scoters are reported from neighboring Essex County. Perhaps more scoters will drop into local waters.


2016 Christmas Bird Counts

Morris and Somerset Christmas Bird Counts in 2016 are as follows:

Saturday, Dec. 17
Great Swamp and Watchung Ridges
Compiler: Simon Lane
greatswampCBC at gmail dot com

Monday, Dec. 26
Boonton
Compiler: Jonathan Klizas
boontoncbc at gmail dot com

Saturday, Dec. 31
Somerset County
Compiler: John Kee
jjkee at optimum dot net

A complete list of New Jersey Christmas Bird Counts is here.


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


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Sandhill Cranes and other birds – Nov. 24, 2016

Sandhill Cranes in Franklin Township

Sandhill Cranes, Franklin Twp., NJ, Nov. 24, 2016 (photo by Michael Yuan)

Sandhill Cranes, Franklin Twp., NJ, Nov. 24, 2016 (photo by Michael Yuan)

The anticipation begins in early November as birders and naturalists of many disciplines await the annual appearance of the Sandhill Cranes in Franklin Township.

There is no guarantee that the cranes will be in view when one visits the area, certainly adding to their allure. A favored location for the cranes and an easy access for birders are the agricultural fields along Randolph Road, Franklin Township. Soybeans were planted there last year. Sandhill Cranes do not give a hoot for soybeans. This made finding the cranes challenging.

However, in 2016 corn was again grown at Randolph Road and on November 17, Jeff Ellerbusch found four returning cranes there – the tenth successive known year that they have wintered in this area.

On November 21, David Bernstein saw an amazing 15 Sandhill Cranes in two flocks fly northwest of the canal across Weston Canal Road where they are difficult, if not impossible, to see.

[FYI: avoid the area north and west of the canal opposite Randolph Road. It is a highly toxic superfund site. See a description here, and a map here.]

Today, Nov. 24, Mike Yuan found six of the Sandhill Cranes at another favored and accessible location in the cornfields near the intersection of Mettlers and Weston Roads. During the past ten years, Sandhill Cranes have been seen at various cornfields in Franklin Township and neighboring Hillsborough Township.  They are not guaranteed to be seen, but are in the area…somewhere.


Other Birds

Common Raven, Timberbrook Lake, Morris Co., NJ, Nov. 24, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Common Raven, Timberbrook Lake, Morris Co., NJ, Nov. 24, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

A brief walk along the west shore of Timberbrook Lake in Rockaway Twp., produced a Winter Wren, an immature Bald Eagle, and a Common Raven occasionally chasing American Crows. Upon exiting the trail, seven (7!) ATVs and eleven (11!) dirt bikes led by an adult in an ATV (at least it was a man of approximately middle age. Perhaps adult is the wrong description) started cruising down the trail. This trail leads to the Four Birds Trail and other paths that course through Farny State Park and the Newark Watershed.

Not-so-Easy-Riders on the trail at Timberbrook Lake, NJ, Nov. 24, 2016 (iPhone photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Not-so-Easy-Riders on the trail at Timberbrook Lake, NJ, Nov. 24, 2016 (iPhone photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Common Raven, Timberbrook Lake, Morris Co., NJ, Nov. 24, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Common Raven, Timberbrook Lake, Morris Co., NJ, Nov. 24, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)


Cackling Geese reports from Somerset County are coming in as wintering Canada Geese flocks arrive en masse into the county.

This eBird reviewer appreciates photos, if possible, or, lacking photos, definitive descriptions of Cackling Geese. Comments such as, “small goose with small bill” do not work. Equally inconclusive are flight identifications. Seeing a small goose with a flock of Canada Geese does not warrant identifying it as a Cackling Goose. Many odd geese are around and unless a 100% positive identification can be documented, listing a bird as goose sp. is perfectly acceptable and better science as well.

Please be precise and treat eBird in a conscientious, professional manner rather than as a casual bird listing tool.


Proving the worth of carrying a camera and having golden ears, Jeff Ellerbusch caught the following Lapland Longspur in a flight photograph and in sound by hearing its rattle call in Bridgewater this past week.

Lapland Longspur, Somerset Co., NJ, Nov. 20, 2016 (photo by Jeff Ellerbusch)

Lapland Longspur, Somerset Co., NJ, Nov. 20, 2016 (photo by Jeff Ellerbusch)


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


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Red Crossbills, other birds – Nov. 15, 2016

Red Crossbills in Morris County

Red Crossbills, Morris County, NJ, Nov. 14, 2016 (photo by Silas Hernandez)

Red Crossbills, Morris County, NJ, Nov. 14, 2016 (photo by Silas Hernandez)

(Click on the photos for larger images.)

As many as nine Red Crossbills were found two consecutive days, Nov. 13-14, at the old Hewlett-Packard property, formerly the Boonton Radio Company (see a history blurb here), and currently Christ Church, at Green Pond and Meridan Road, Rockaway (Silas Hernandez, photos). This private property straddles Rockaway and Denville Townships in Morris County .

Do not think of visiting the location as you will be asked to leave, if you can get in.

However, Jonathan’s Woods, a Morris County park, borders the property and is very accessible from Old Beech Glen Road. A few pines remain of the so-called Cathedral Pines that formerly graced Jonathan’s Woods. Most of these trees were wiped out during superstorm Sandy (see a post from that time here) and the fallen trunks removed a few years later.

As far as is known, the Red Crossbills were not observed today despite observers searching for them.


Snow Bunting at Glenhurst Meadows

Snow Bunting, Glenhurst Meadows, NJ, Nov. 14, 2016 (photo by Jeff Ellerbusch)

Snow Bunting, Glenhurst Meadows, NJ, Nov. 14, 2016 (photo by Jeff Ellerbusch)

Mike Hiotis located a Snow Bunting at the community garden parking lot of Wagner’s Arboretum, Glenhurst Meadows, Nov. 14. The bunting was present this morning (David Bernstein). A Snow Bunting was also photographed by a non-eBirder at this location on November 8.


Spackling Goose, R.I.P.

Spackling Goose at Duke Farms, Jan. 29, 2013 (photo by Jim Mulvey).

Spackling Goose at Duke Farms, Jan. 29, 2013 (photo by Jim Mulvey).

It is brought to mocosocoBirds attention that the famed Spackling Goose of Somerset County was hunted and killed recently, most likely in Hillsborough Twp. Birders will miss this beloved goose who made an appearance each fall and winter in Somerset County since at least 2012 and probably much longer than that.

An older post on the history of the goose is here.

The Greater White-Fronted Goose and the Spackling Goose at Duke Island Park, Jan. 2, 2013 (Photo by Zach Batren).

The Greater White-Fronted Goose and the Spackling Goose at Duke Island Park, Jan. 2, 2013 (Photo by Zach Batren).


Other birds

Most of the Red-headed Woodpeckers (RHWO) reported from Glenhurst Meadows are actually north of the Passaic River in Morris County. A walk at the Long Hill Wetlands last Sunday produced nine RHWOs.

With the 12+ RHWOs at Troy Meadows, a few at the Lord Stirling Park/Great Swamp NWR border and the RHWOs at Long Hill Wetlands and Glenhurst Meadows, the mocosocoBirds region is easily  the Red-headed Woodpecker capital of New Jersey.

Below is a Red-headed Woodpecker with an acorn stash at the Long Hill Wetlands. Be aware that the Long Hill Wetlands, while being part of the Morris County Parks System according to the placards on trees, has no trails, poison ivy is abundant in summer and it floods very easily and frequently.

Red-headed Woodpecker, Long Hill Twp., NJ, Nov. 13, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Red-headed Woodpecker, Long Hill Twp., NJ, Nov. 13, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)


Photos

Fox Sparrow, Long Hill Twp., NJ, Nov. 13, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Fox Sparrow, Long Hill Twp., NJ, Nov. 13, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Supermoon, Morris Twp., NJ, Nov. 13, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Supermoon, Morris Twp., NJ, Nov. 13, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


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Orange-crowned Warbler, Red-headed Woodpeckers, Great Cormorant – Nov. 11, 2016

Orange-crowned Warbler and Red-headed Woodpeckers

An Orange-crowned Warbler found Nov. 10 at Troy Meadows by Roger Johnson put in a brief five second appearance again this morning (Rob Fanning). Anyone wishing to try for this western wanderer should park at the lot marked South Beverwyck Road on the map.

From the parking lot, continue on the wide, mowed Patriots Path to the gas line, turn right on Patriots Path crossing the gas line and eventually going underneath the power line staying on the wide, mowed Patriots Path the entire time (there are many narrower, overgrown secondary paths in the area).

After traveling under the power line you will walk through small trees, bushes and scrub. At one point you will come to the peak of the hill where Patriots Path enters a wooded area. Just before the woods, another path intersects with Patriots Path. Turn left on this other path and continue until you see – yes, here it is: The Blue Pipe.

The Blue Pipe, Troy Meadows, NJ, Nov. 10, 2016 (iPhone photo by Jonathan Klizas))

The Blue Pipe, Troy Meadows, NJ, Nov. 10, 2016 (iPhone photo by Jonathan Klizas))

The Orange Crowned Warbler has been seen at this location for two successive mornings, albeit briefly.

Red-headed Woodpecker, Troy Meadows, NJ, Nov. 11, 2016 (photo by jonathan Klizas)

Red-headed Woodpecker, Troy Meadows, NJ, Nov. 11, 2016 (photo by jonathan Klizas)

Also at Troy Meadows are Red-headed Woodpeckers – lots of Red-headed Woodpeckers. In the section of the woods accessed via Alan Drive are approximately 12 Red-headed Woodpeckers (RHWO). This does not account for any other RHWOs that are elsewhere at Troy Meadows.

Red-headed Woodpecker, Troy Meadows, NJ, Nov. 11, 2016 (photo by jonathan Klizas)

Red-headed Woodpecker, Troy Meadows, NJ, Nov. 11, 2016 (photo by jonathan Klizas)


Boonton Reservoir

Boonton Reservoir, NJ, Nov. 10, 2016 (iPhone photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Boonton Reservoir, NJ, Nov. 10, 2016 (iPhone photo by Jonathan Klizas)

The above photo is a view from the footbridge at the north end of Boonton Reservoir looking west towards the Rt. 202 bridge where the Cliff Swallows nest in spring and summer. The dark water mark on the bridge piling is where the typical level is for the reservoir when it is filled to capacity. As one can see, the water level is quite low. In the background is where the Rockaway River feeds into the reservoir. This area is usually filled with water. Increasingly large areas of exposed edge and rocky shoals throughout the reservoir are becoming visible.

Even with the low and diminishing water level, a Common Loon and Horned Grebe were found at the reservoir yesterday, Nov. 10.


Great Cormorant at Lake Parsippany

Great Cormorant, Lake Parsippany, NJ, Nov. 11, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Great Cormorant, Lake Parsippany, NJ, Nov. 11, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Yet another Great Cormorant was found in Morris County today by Julie (Buechner) Stroffolino, this time at Lake Parsippany. This is the third record this season of this relatively rare species for Morris County.

Is it the same individual that was found at Jefferson Road Pond on October 19 and stayed for one more day? Or the cormorant that spent nearly two weeks at Lake Musconetcong from Oct. 25 through November 6 (photo here)?

All three sightings are of a juvenile and the dates never overlap, so…

Great Cormorant, Lake Parsippany, NJ, Nov. 11, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Great Cormorant, Lake Parsippany, NJ, Nov. 11, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Incidentally, to anyone looking for the Great Cormorant, do not confuse it with the smaller, immature Double-crested Cormorant which is also at Lake Parsippany.

Double-crested Cormorant, Lake Parsippany, NJ, Nov. 11, 2016 photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Double-crested Cormorant, Lake Parsippany, NJ, Nov. 11, 2016 photo by Jonathan Klizas)


Red-headed Woodpeckers at Glenhurst Meadows

Not to be forgotten, Somerset County’s Red-headed Woodpecker hotspot has an update provided by Mike Hiotis from Nov. 7:

“I “saw” 6 Red-headed Woodpeckers (3 ad., 3 imm.) at Glenhurst Meadows 11/7/16. At least one more bird was heard while viewing an adult. Also had 3 Deer Ticks tag along with me so check oneself when walking here.”



View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


Posted in Morris County, Somerset County | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Grebes in Morris County; Early November Birds – Nov. 7, 2016

New Species for Somerset County

Sometimes they come in bunches. October 26 saw the first Surf Scoter recorded in Somerset County. Following close to that sighting was the county’s first recorded Long-billed Dowitcher on November 1. Jeff Ellerbusch is guilty as charged in finding both of these firsts.

The Long-billed Dowitcher finding is especially impressive as it was a flyover, identified by its distinctive call. It has not been relocated since. The area both of these birds were found in is off-limits to the general public.


Eared Grebe in Morris County

Eared Grebe, Mt. Hope Lake, Rockaway Twp., NJ, Nov. 1, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Eared Grebe, Mt. Hope Lake, Rockaway Twp., NJ, Nov. 1, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

(Click on the photo for a larger image.)

A grebe was seen and photographed on Nov. 1 at Mt. Hope Lake in Rockaway Twp. (labeled Mill Pond on Google Maps). After consulting with experienced observers, it is positively identified as an Eared Grebe. If accepted by the New Jersey Bird Record Committee, this will be the first record of this species in Morris County.

The grebe was last seen on Saturday, Nov. 5. The grebe was not seen Nov. 6 and 7 despite several people searching. This sighting was not publicized through usual social media channels due to the private nature of the viewing property.


Red-necked Grebe, Snow Buntings at Budd Lake

Red-necked Grebe, Budd Lake, NJ, Nov. 7, 2016 (photo by Alan Boyd)

Red-necked Grebe, Budd Lake, NJ, Nov. 7, 2016 (photo by Alan Boyd)

Alan Boyd found the Red-necked Grebe in the above photo this afternoon in the southeast section of Budd Lake. This is across from the CVS store on Rt. 46. By late afternoon it had drifted slightly north-west towards the center of the lake. At this time it was viewable via scope only from the municipal beach at the south end of the lake (or south-west end, if you prefer).

Also at the south end was the annual November appearance of Snow Buntings at the Budd Lake Municipal Beach. Snow Buntings are an unusual sighting in both Morris and Somerset Counties with only a handful of historical records. For the past three years, Snow Buntings have been found at the beach on the following dates, in numbers never greater than three:

  • 2014 – Nov. 4 through 8.
  • 2015 – Nov. 14.
  • 2016 – Nov. 7.
Snow Buntings, Budd Lake, NJ, Nov. 7, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Snow Buntings, Budd Lake, NJ, Nov. 7, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)


Other Bird Notes

Ben Barkley looked up at the right time on Saturday, Nov. 5 as a Northern Goshawk passed overhead. Ben was fortunate to get photos documenting the moment.

Northern Goshawk, Lord Stirling Park, NJ, Nov. 5, 2016 (photo by Ben Barkley)

Northern Goshawk, Lord Stirling Park, NJ, Nov. 5, 2016 (photo by Ben Barkley)


The Great Cormorant of Lake Musconetcong has apparently departed as it was not seen today for the first time since Oct. 25.

Great Cormorant, Lake Musconetcong, NJ, Nov. 5, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Great Cormorant, Lake Musconetcong, NJ, Nov. 5, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Great Cormorant, Lake Musconetcong, NJ, Nov. 5, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Great Cormorant, Lake Musconetcong, NJ, Nov. 5, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)


Ivan Kossak informs mocosocoBirds that the Great Lincoln Park Bird Count is up to 150 species for 2016 with the sighting of Rusty Blackbirds on Nov. 2 at Beavertown Park. Lincoln Park was formerly known as Beavertown.


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


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