Prothonotary Warbler at Lincoln Park – May 21, 2016

Prothonotary Warbler, Lincoln Park Gravel Pits, NJ, May 21, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Prothonotary Warbler, Lincoln Park Gravel Pits, NJ, May 21, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

(Click on the photo for a larger image.)

On the morning of Tuesday, May 24, Roger Johnson hit the jackpot at the Lincoln Park Gravel Pits (“the Pits”) tallying more than 80 species. Included in this total was a singing Mourning Warbler which was found and barely photographed by this observer later in the afternoon (see that mocosocoBirds post here).

Also on that day, a Prothonotary Warbler was seen and heard by Roger at the beaver dam near the berm separating the municipal swimming lake from the Pits’ main lake. It was not found in the afternoon.

Incidentally, the beavers are having a chew-fest with the trees at the Pits. In the course of one-half year they have obliterated a section of young willows from the north end of the main lake and amazingly done the same with a stand of young trees at the south end. Beaver-ness is evident around the entire perimeter of the lake.

Yellow-billed Cuckoos (YBCU) are widespread during the past week with multiple individuals present at many suitable locations in Morris County. The Pits had at least four this morning. An interesting note about the YBCU in the photo below is that he vocalized with the worm in his bill, pulsating his throat while uttering the percussive ka-ka-ka-ka-kow-kow-kow-kow-kowlp-kowlp-kowlp. 

Yellow-billed Cuckoo, Lincoln Park Gravel Pits, NJ, May 21, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Yellow-billed Cuckoo, Lincoln Park Gravel Pits, NJ, May 21, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

The Birds of North America Online states that the Yellow-billed Cuckoo “has been dubbed the Raincrow because of its apparent tendency to call more frequently on cloudy days”. It certainly was cloudy this morning with multiple Yellow-billed Cuckoos frequently calling, although their proficiency as a forecaster of rain is not substantiated.

The Yellow-billed Cuckoo in the above photo almost drowned out the subject of this post. After departing from an extended stay with the Cuckoo, this observer heard another interesting song. It goes something like this: song of the Prothonotary Warbler (at the Pits).

It took ten or more minutes to finally track down the source of this song. The photo at the top of this post is of the singer on the recording, once known as the Golden Swamp Warbler. The location is approximately 2,500 feet southeast from the beaver dam where it was seen on May 21, according to the Google Maps distance calculator. The Prothonotary Warbler (PROW) was very territorial and singing constantly. The moss in the PROW’s bill gives evidence to a possible nesting attempt.

A female was not seen, although a potential nesting site was witnessed. There are no known breeding records of PROW in this section of Morris County. PROWs have bred periodically for years at the Great Swamp NWR. Other than that, the only known possible record in Morris is one from the Denville/Tourne County Park area during the New Jersey Breeding Bird Atlas of the 1990s. If any other Morris breeding records are known please send them to mocosocoBirds.

Not a frequently recorded member of the northern New Jersey avifauna, another Prothonotary Warbler is reported this week on Thunder Mountain Road in Sussex County. Read the Sussex County Bird Club’s sighting page here.

A fraction of Tuesday’s shorebirds at the Pits were present today with only 14 Least Sandpipers, a pair of Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs, one Solitary Sandpiper and at least 11 Spotted Sandpipers.

Not a single migrant passerine was recorded today at the Pits. As stated in this space previously, the Pits is not an easy place to get around in. You can enter via a path at the north end near Kamm Street and walk the berm. This is publicly accessible as far as is known. Any where else in the Pits? – you are on your own. A disconcerting development is the increased presence this year of destructive ATV trails with many muddy tracks in the heart of the shorebird habitat.


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.

The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.


Finis


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Mourning Warbler, Shorebirds in Morris – May 17, 2016

The Lincoln Park Gravel Pits, an historic Morris birding location from the 1960s through the early 1980s, proved to be a local hotspot today. 80+ species were tallied in the morning by Roger Johnson. The highlights are 18 warbler species including Mourning and Prothonotary Warblers, Yellow-bellied Flycatcher and only the second known record of White-rumped Sandpiper in Morris County in the past 40 years.

In the afternoon, the alleged same Mourning Warbler was seen and barely photographed as witnessed in the photo below, before two young boys (younger than teen-age) on ATVs passed by, spooking the Mourning Warbler. It was not relocated.

Mourning Warbler, Lincoln Park Gravel Pits, NJ, May 17, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Mourning Warbler, Lincoln Park Gravel Pits, NJ, May 17, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

The White-rumped Sandpiper was not seen in the afternoon. 76 Least Sandpipers, 1 Semipalmated Plover, 5 Lesser Yellowlegs and 4 Greater Yellowlegs as well as 5 Killdeer, 2 Solitary Sandpipers and 1 Spotted Sandpiper were foraging on the partially flooded flats of the Pits.

Semipalmated Plover, Lincoln Park Gravel Pits, NJ, May 17, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Semipalmated Plover, Lincoln Park Gravel Pits, NJ, May 17, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

The Gravel Pits is not a convenience birding destination. Explicit directions are not given here because there really is no easy way to get around in the pits unless you know it. Walking the berm between the municipal lake and the Pits main pond is the only relatively convenient path. Other than that, you are on your own and wear boots if you go.

Least Sandpiper, Lincoln Park Gravel Pits, NJ, May 17, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Least Sandpiper, Lincoln Park Gravel Pits, NJ, May 17, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.

The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.


Finis


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Weekend Bird Migration – May 15, 2016

Acadian Flycatcher, Mahlon Dickerson Reservation, Jefferson Twp., NJ, May 14, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Acadian Flycatcher, Mahlon Dickerson Reservation, Jefferson Twp., NJ, May 14, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

(Click on the photo for a larger image.)

During the past two days, migrant songbirds were as plentiful as can be in the 21st century throughout the state of New Jersey. At least for the present, the phenomena of mid-May migration that New Jersey is enjoying represents a beautiful and exciting glimpse of the natural world Homo sapiens has the ability to preserve and nurture.

This writer remembers listening to older birders thirty years ago bemoaning the decreasing amount of spring migrants just as contemporary older birders do at the current time in 2016. What observers have witnessed the past two weekends, as numerous migrants have seemingly been dumped in our laps and adjectives such as “memorable” are used to describe the event, would probably rate an average grade, at best, in generations past.


New Jersey Audubon’s World Series of Birding occurred on May 14 from 00:00:00 to 23:59:59. The strategy for many of the teams is to start at the Great Swamp NWR for nocturnal marsh birds. The usual Virginia Rails, Soras, Bitterns, Owls and the other You-really-expect-me-to-believe-you-heard-that species were tallied.

What many teams may have missed was a King Rail in the management area that a crew of Morris County birders, out on a casual friendly outing, heard and recorded at dawn. A brief sampling of the kek-brrrr call the rail uttered for a lengthy time (with competition from Yellow Warblers, Red-winged Blackbirds, et al) is here.

At nearly the same time the King Rail was vocalizing, a pair of Common Nighthawks appeared hunting in the misty morning dawn light.

This same group of Morris adventurers tallied a respectable 24 warbler species in the Morris Highlands and environs including Louisiana Waterthrush, Cape May, Hooded, Chestnut-sided, Blackpoll, Wilson’s, Black-throated Green, Black-throated Blue and Blackburnian Warblers in the Lake Denmark area; Pine Warblers at Deerhaven Lake; 14 species of warblers in Mahlon Dickerson Reservation including Worm-eating, Northern Waterthrush, Hooded, Bay-breasted and Canada Warblers. Most of the Mahlon Dickerson warblers are nesters.

The Acadian Flycatcher in the photo at the top of this post is at Mahlon Dickerson Reservation near the “Pine Swamp” along the white-blazed Pine Swamp trail accessed via Sparta Mountain Road, the northwest corner of Morris County. This species is found here nearly every year. A second Acadian Flycatcher was at the other reliable location along Weldon Brook on the Ogden Mine RR trail accessed from Saffin Pond.

Inexplicably, the usually reliable Least Flycatchers at Mahlon Dickerson have yet to put in an appearance.

Cerulean Warblers have returned to Waterloo Valley Road as have a small number of Bank Swallows to the colony at Tilcon Lake.


Despite blustery, cool conditions today, May 15, migrants continue to spread themselves throughout the Morris area. 14 species of warblers were found at Troy Meadows this morning including at least 2 Wilson’s Warblers as well as Canada Warblers and Northern Waterthrushes.

Wilson's Warbler, Troy Meadows, NJ, May 15, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Wilson’s Warbler, Troy Meadows, NJ, May 15, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

4 Solitary Sandpipers were along a short stretch of Troy Brook on Troy Meadows Road.

Solitary Sandpiper, Troy Meadows, NJ, May 15, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Solitary Sandpiper, Troy Meadows, NJ, May 15, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)


Lincoln Sparrows are reported today from the Great Swamp NWR (Simon Lane) and Troy Meadows (Roger Johnson).


Dave Blinder found a White-eyed Vireo today in a swamp at Wildcat Ridge WMA off of Upper Hibernia Road, Rockaway Township. This is proving to be a scarce species in Morris during 2016.

White-eyed Vireo, Rockaway Twp., NJ, May 15, 2016 (photo by David Blinder)

White-eyed Vireo, Rockaway Twp., NJ, May 15, 2016 (photo by David Blinder)


Jim Mulvey snagged the following White-crowned Sparrow image at the Great Swamp NWR yesterday, May 14.

White-crowned Sparrow, Great Swamp NWR, NJ, May 14, 2016 (photo by Jim Mulvey)

White-crowned Sparrow, Great Swamp NWR, NJ, May 14, 2016 (photo by Jim Mulvey)


Many checklists and interesting sightings exist for the past few days, too many to list here. This is to be expected during this exciting time of year. View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.

The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.


Finis


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Raptor Trust Benefit: May 22, 2016

Raptor Trust

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Bobolinks, Whip-poor-wills and a Birder Passes – May 9, 2016

Bobolinks

Bobolink, Harding Twp., NJ, May 9, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Bobolink, Harding Twp., NJ, May 9, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

(Click on the photo for a larger image.)

Bobolinks have arrived in their typical locations. Somerset County has a goodly amount of  Bobolink habitat with Duke Farms being the main player.

Morris County, on the other hand, is light on Bobolink habitat but is fortunate to have a few reliable Bobolink locations.  Of course, Bobolinks can possibly be found in any suitable grassland habitat during migration.


Eastern Whip-poor-wills

Eastern Whip-poor-wills are in their traditional Lake Denmark locations. Two were calling tonight, May 9, approximately twenty minutes after sunset.


All it takes is a puddle

The very obliging Least Sandpiper in the photo below was foraging in a tiny, muddy puddle in a dirt and gravel area off of the driveway at Florham Park Fields late this afternoon.

Least Sandpiper, Florham Park, NJ, May 9, 2016 (photo by honathan Klizas)

Least Sandpiper, Florham Park, NJ, May 9, 2016 (photo by honathan Klizas)



In memoriam: Cliff Miles

It is with a great deal of sadness that mocosocoBirds learned of the passing of Cliff Miles of Mountain Lakes, Morris County on May 6, 2016. I had the privilege of sharing a route on the Boonton Christmas Bird Count with Cliff most years since 2003. It was always a pleasure to see Cliff who was frequently accompanied by his son, Rick.

Cliff was a hands-on person, manning the hawk watch at Wildcat Ridge and performing many other duties in his love for nature. He had a kind, giving spirit and a hearty laugh. Cliff will be sorely missed.

The Land Conservancy of New Jersey has a tribute to Cliff on their Facebook page. The link is here.



To get a more complete picture of what people are reporting during this busy birding season, view local checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.

The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.


Finis


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Bird Migration Fallout – May 8, 2016

Waterloo Valley Road

Cerulean Warbler, Mt. Olive Twp., NJ, May 8, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Cerulean Warbler, Mt. Olive Twp., NJ, May 8, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

(Click on the photo for a larger image.)

“Rain” was not the only four-letter word uttered this morning at approximately 6:30 AM when the latest barrage of precipitation pelted Morris County.  Those expecting to greet a new influx of migrating birds were instead welcomed with an increasing crescendo of falling rain.

But…when the rain stopped an hour or so later, something magical happened. The woods this observer was in exploded with birds and bird song. Warblers, Tanagers, Grosbeaks, et al, were flying from branch-to-branch moving in and out of view so quickly it was hard to get an accurate tally of species.

Bird migration fallout conditions were experienced in much of New Jersey this morning. One hopes that all who are reading this were able to get out and bask in the May migration experience. It does not happen often. Even blue skies and the sun finally reappeared:

Tilcon Lake with Stephens State Park in the background, May 8, 2016 (iPhone photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Tilcon Lake with Stephens State Park in the background, May 8, 2016 (iPhone photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Waterloo Valley Road in Mt. Olive Township was the scene of this writer’s migration adventure – five miles from International Drive to the Stephens State Park bridge over the Musconetcong River. Another trip was made to neighboring Tilcon Lake.

Waterloo Valley Road is a pothole-ridden, mostly dirt and gravel road that is notorious for its lack of upkeep – a good thing because it keeps the traffic down. Actually, one will rarely see a car on this road at all. High clearance vehicles are preferred although a certain Prius has navigated this road many times.

17 species of warblers were heard and seen, a modest amount compared to other well-known spring migrant traps, but a nice haul for a little known spot in Morris County (and for a birder who is more than 50% deaf!).

Cerulean Warblers are the stars on this road. Two were seen and heard today southwest of Tilcon Lake, between the railroad tracks and the beginning of the Saxton Falls Sand and Gravel operation (see the photo at the top of this page).

American Redstarts dominate the road’s edge while Ovenbirds and Wood Thrushes sing from the woods. Chestnut-sided Warblers, Black-throated Green and Blue Warblers, Hooded, Magnolia and Canada Warblers were part of the action this morning.

Broad-winged Hawk, Mt. Olive Twp., NJ, May 8, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Broad-winged Hawk, Mt. Olive Twp., NJ, May 8, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)


Sandhill Crane in the Great Swamp NWR

Matthew Zeitler was in the right place at the right time and captured a photograph of a Sandhill Crane flying over the Great Swamp NWR on May 7, 2016. This is the 7th known record of this species in Morris County. The most recent was a number of sightings in March of 2014.

Sandhill Crane, Great Swamp NWR, NJ, May 7, 2016 (photo by Matthew Zeitler)

Sandhill Crane, Great Swamp NWR, NJ, May 7, 2016 (photo by Matthew Zeitler)


To get a more complete picture of what people are reporting during this busy birding season, view local checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.

The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.


Finis


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Rain, more rain and Bird Migration – May 7, 2016

Common Loons, Boonton Reservoir, NJ, May 7, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Common Loons, Boonton Reservoir, NJ, May 7, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

(Click on the photo for a larger image.)

This week’s weather, consisting mostly of a damp, chilly, easterly-northeasterly air flow, has slowed the migratory push that observers crave this time of year. Nonetheless, birds are everywhere at this time.

41 Common Loons waited out the rain in Boonton Reservoir today. The above photo is a sampling of the loon gathering. Most were in two large groups with singletons and duos resting and feeding in the reservoir north of the island. All but two were in alternate plumage.


Red-headed Woodpeckers continue with 4 at Glenhurst Meadows reported today (Jeff Ellerbusch) and 10 at Troy Meadows (Roger Johnson).


Rose-breasted Grosbeaks are everywhere this week with many people reporting them at feeders (including this writer) as well as in the field.


Hermit Thrushes have moved on from most of the Morris/Somerset area. Veerys have moved into their preferred habitats. The mocosocoBirds area’s first Swainson’s Thrush was not reported until early this evening at Jockey Hollow.


One phenomena that the wet, low-pressure, dreary weather can create is large congregations of swallows over lakes and ponds. Migrating Bank Swallows were found in several places amidst the Tree/Barn/Northern Rough-winged Swallow flocks this week. Barn Swallows have arrived in full. Chimney Swifts are finally back in Morristown. A visit to Budd Lake on May 4 produced hundreds of swallows including ~50 Purple Martins.


Cornell Laboratory’s Bird Cast Regional Forecast for the Upper Midwest and Northeast, May 6-13 can be found here.

Analysis of the previous week, April 29-May 6, 2016, is here.


Great Blue Heron, Boonton Reservoir, NJ, May 7, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Great Blue Heron, Boonton Reservoir, NJ, May 7, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)


Bird migration activity is simply too busy at this time to list all reports in this space. To get a more complete picture of what people are reporting, view local checklists in the mocosocoBirdsregion via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.

The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.


Finis


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Bird Migration Notes – Apr. 30, 2016

American Redstart, Rockaway Twp., NJ, Apr. 30, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

American Redstart, Rockaway Twp., NJ, Apr. 30, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

(Click on the photo for a larger image.)

Pity those who do not bird or study nature this time of year. April is flipping the calendar page to May and the climax of spring migration is close at hand. It is impossible to venture into the woods and fields this past week and not find new bird, plant and insect species for the year.

Although the radar has shown little migration in north New Jersey the past few days, birds are everywhere in the proper habitat. American Redstarts have invaded the Snake Hill Road-Lake Denmark area as witnessed this morning. Yellow-throated Vireos are moving into their usual spots. Four not-so-Solitary Sandpipers were seen on one sliver of mudbar at Loantaka Brook Reservation yesterday. Cliff Swallows have returned again to Boonton Reservoir. Every day brings new migrants and nesters into the area.

All of New Jersey’s nesting Vireo species are in the mocosocoBirds area. Warbler numbers are growing. Empidonax flycatchers are on their way with the season’s first Least Flycatcher visiting the Great Swamp NWR this morning (Simon Lane).


This morning, a Fish Crow called diagnostically and frantically while perched on top of a high voltage tower at Lake Denmark. Eventually, the local Common Raven came into the area at which time the Fish Crow commenced to harass the Raven for the next few minutes creating the silhouette image below. Both corvids eventually flew off.

Fish Crow Harassing Common Raven, Rockaway Twp., NJ, Apr. 30, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Fish Crow Harassing Common Raven, Rockaway Twp., NJ, Apr. 30, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Below is a serene scene of Lake Denmark looking north. In the background is PSE&G’s mammoth Susquehanna-Roseland transmission line.

Lake Denmark, NJ, Apr. 30, 2016 (iPhone photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Lake Denmark, NJ, Apr. 30, 2016 (iPhone photo by Jonathan Klizas)


Cornell Laboratory’s Bird Cast Regional Forecast for the Upper Midwest and Northeast, April 29-May 6 can be found here.

Analysis of the previous week, April 22-29, 2016, is here.


Bird migration activity is simply too busy at this time to list in this space. To get a more complete picture of what people are reporting, view local checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.

The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.


Finis


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Bird Migration Notes – Apr. 24, 2016

Dave Blinder captured the following image of a male Pileated Woodpecker at Bee Meadow Park, Hanover Twp. this morning.

Pileated Woodpecker, Hanover Twp., NJ, Apr. 24, 2016 ( photo by David Blinder)

Pileated Woodpecker, Hanover Twp., NJ, Apr. 24, 2016 (photo by David Blinder)

(Click on the photo for a larger image.)


Migration stepped up a notch this weekend with a variety of migrants coming and passing through the Morris and Somerset region.

The list of species gleaned from eBird and other sources includes: Broad-winged Hawk (162 passed the Wildcat Ridge hawkwatch in Hibernia today), Greater Yellowlegs, Spotted and Solitary Sandpipers, White-eyed and Blue-headed Vireos, House Wren, Gray Catbird, Brown Thrasher, Ovenbird, Black-and-white Warbler, Common Yellowthroat, Northern Parula, Yellow Warbler (everywhere), Worm-eating Warbler, Orchard and Baltimore Orioles, Eastern Meadowlark (Denville, Giralda Farms Preserve), etc, etc.

Baltimore Oriole, Hanover Twp., NJ, Apr. 24, 2016 (photo by Chuck Hantis)

Baltimore Oriole, Hanover Twp., NJ, Apr. 24, 2016 (photo by Chuck Hantis)


Yellow-rumped Warblers should be near peak numbers this week.

Yellow-rumped Warbler, Lincoln Park Gravel Pits, NJ, Apr. 24, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Yellow-rumped Warbler, Lincoln Park Gravel Pits, NJ, Apr. 24, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)


And this is why it is called Spotted Sandpiper (despite the distant, noisy, poor photo):

Spotted Sandpiper, Lincoln Park Gravel Pits, Apr. 24, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Spotted Sandpiper, Lincoln Park Gravel Pits, Apr. 24, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)


Brown Thrashers are currently in many locations:

Brown Thrasher, Troy Meadows, NJ, Apr. 22, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Brown Thrasher, Troy Meadows, NJ, Apr. 22, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)


And as this post is about to be published, the Morris Township Police Department just issued a notice: the smoke and haze in the area is from a brush fire in eastern Pennsylvania. A walk outside confirms the smell. Others mention seeing the haze while driving. It is best to keep the windows closed.


Cornell Laboratory’s Bird Cast Regional Forecast for the Upper Midwest and Northeast, April 22-29 can be found here.

Analysis of the previous week, April 15-22, 2016, is here.


Bird migration activity continues to build and the number of birders submitting checklists to eBird is growing. To get a more complete picture of what people are reporting, view local checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.

The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.


Finis


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Caspian Terns in Morris – Apr. 20, 2016

Caspians on the Rocks

Caspian Terns, Lk. Musconetcong, NJ, Apr. 20, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Caspian Terns, Lk. Musconetcong, NJ, Apr. 20, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

(Click on the photo for a larger image.)

Tom Halliwell found two Caspian Terns this morning on the rocks near Water Street at Lake Musconetcong. The two terns were present this afternoon and joined by a third Caspian Tern on the rocks by Koclas Drive. The Ring-billed Gulls are gracious hosts on the Musconetcong rocks.

Single Caspian Terns were sighted at the same location on April 11 and 21 of 2015.

Caspian Tern, Lk. Musconetcong, NJ, Apr. 20, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Caspian Tern, Lk. Musconetcong, NJ, Apr. 20, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)


2 Bonaparte’s Gulls and one Common Loon continue at Lake Hopatcong despite motor boats, speed boats, kayaks, jet skis and several sculling crews invading their water space. At one point in time, the Bonaparte’s Gulls were practically submerged by a speed boat but didn’t even move.


Bird migration activity is building and the number of birders submitting checklists to eBird is growing. To get a more complete picture of what people are reporting, view local checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.

The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.


Finis


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