Surf Scoter, Eurasian Wigeon, Red-throated Loon, Northern Shrike – Nov. 5, 2017

An adult male Surf Scoter at Lake Parsippany capped a productive five-day period of local rarities in Morris County. The Scoter was viewed throughout the day, resting with its head tucked in. Occasionally, it would lift its head showing off its orange bill.

Surf Scoter with Ruddy Ducks and Buffleheads, Lake Parsippany, NJ, Nov. 5, 2017


The Red-throated Loon of Boonton Reservoir continues for a  fifth day. The Great Cormorant found on November 1 has not been seen since.

Red-throated Loon, Boonton Reservoir, NJ, Nov. 5, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)


A drake Eurasian Wigeon was found yesterday, November 4, at the Clark Drive swamp in Mount Olive Township. A Eurasian Wigeon spent last fall and winter in the western lakes of Morris County.

Some may remember Clark Drive from 2012 when up to 18 Redheads were in the corporate pond. The swamp fed by Wills Brook on the northeast side of the railroad tracks is a productive waterfowl spot. The species present Nov. 4 included the Eurasian Wigeon, 3 Northern Shovelers, 35 Gadwall, 12 American Wigeon, 4 Green-winged Teal, 6 Am. Black Ducks, a Pied-billed Grebe, 2 Great Blue Herons and 2 American Coot as well as Mallards, Canada Geese and a Belted Kingfisher.

Eurasian Wigeon, Mt. Olive Twp., NJ, Nov. 4, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)


A Magnolia Warbler at the Tilcon Lake area of Mount Olive Twp. on Nov. 4 was both a surprise and a probable locally late date for this species.

The Northern Shrike continues at the overlook on Pleasant Plains Road in the Great Swamp NWR. Some people saw it today and some didn’t.

Morristown’s White Ibis at Speedwell Lake was seen through yesterday, Nov. 4 but not today. It could simply be in an inaccessible location or flown to warmer climes.

Vesper Sparrows were seen today at the Great Swamp (many observers), and the old, defunct Hanover airport in Troy Meadows (Jeff Ellerbusch) where two late western Palm Warblers were also present.


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


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Northern Shrike at Great Swamp NWR – Nov. 3, 2017

A Northern Shrike, more than likely the same individual found by Patrick (DiMarco) Finch on October 24, was relocated November 1 by Fred Weber at the Great Swamp NWR and seen by many observers today, Nov. 3.

The Northern Shrike was seen at the tops of dead trees, shifting from perch to perch, generally north of the overlook on Pleasant Plains Road. A spotting scope increases the chance of a decent view. The Shrike was a little too far for decent photographs (besides, this writer’s DSLR is currently in Canon rehab).

Northern Shrike, Great Swamp NWR, NJ, Nov. 3, 2017 (documentation photo by Alan Boyd)

PLEASE NOTE: The Great Swamp NWR will be closed Saturday, November 4, due to hunting.

Formerly an almost annual location for wintering Northern Shrikes, the species has been absent from the Great Swamp in recent years.


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


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November White Ibis, Red-throated Loon, Other Birds – Nov. 1, 2017

White Ibis with Great Egret, Speedwell Lake, Morristown, NJ, Nov. 1, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

(Click on the photo for a larger image.)

Morristown’s White Ibis continues at Speedwell Lake as of November 1. This Ibis is approaching historic status. According to the eBird database, the only November records for White Ibis in November in the northeast, north of the Delmarva Peninsula are records from 2012 in Rhode Island and Cape May, 2011 in Pennsylvania, 2015 in Burlington County and 1979 in Connecticut. Further west are records from western New York in 1990 and northeastern Ohio in 2011.

The NJ Bird Record Committee began reviewing White Ibis records in 1996 and includes the 2012 Cape May sighting. There are no records of White Ibis later than October prior to 1996, actually prior to 2012. The history of this White Ibis can be followed on these posts:


Red-throated Loon, Great Cormorant, Bonaparte’s Gulls at Boonton Reservoir

An unusual Red-throated Loon was observed at the north end of Boonton Reservoir this afternoon by Rob Fanning and yours truly. It is unusual as it has a darker than expected neck as if vestiges of alternate plumage remain. The only photos obtainable are useless due to the distance and poor light.

Also at the northern end, a Great Cormorant was on the western shore before flying to the eastern shore. Morris County seems to get a quota of one Great Cormorant every fall. Once again, poor light makes for a mediocre photo.

Great Cormorant, Boonton Reservoir, NJ, Nov. 1, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

At least two Bonaparte’s Gulls were at the south end of the reservoir this afternoon.


Other Birds

As many as five Bonaparte’s Gulls were at Lake Musconetcong this afternoon (Alan Boyd). At least some of these were present on October 31 as well.

American Pipits have occasionally visited Florham Park Fields in recent weeks. Chuck Hantis captured the following images late in the day on October 30.

American Pipit, Florham Park, NJ, Oct. 30, 2017 (photo by Chuck Hantis)

American Pipit, Florham Park, NJ, Oct. 30, 2017 (photo by Chuck Hantis)


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


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White Ibis continues in Morristown – Oct. 25, 2017

White Ibis, Speedwell Lake, Morristown, NJ, Oct. 25, 2017 (photo by Chuck Hantis)

(Click on the photo for a larger image.)

The White Ibis of Speedwell Lake, Morristown continues as of late this afternoon, Oct. 25. The previous post about this Morris rarity is here.

Yesterday, Chris Thomas saw the Ibis fly from the lake in a southeasterly direction at approximately 5:40 PM. Lake Pocahontas, another section of the Whippany River is close-by in that direction, making a potentially suitable evening roost site.

This afternoon, Chuck Hantis saw the White Ibis in the far western section of Speedwell Lake. At 4:30, he saw it fly in a westerly direction further up the Whippany River. Lots of riverine nooks and crannies exist that the Ibis can hide in.

Here is a screenshot of an eBird-generated range map of current White Ibis sightings along the Atlantic coast. The northernmost pinpoint is Morristown’s White Ibis. As one can see, the next closest is Cape May and the Delmarva peninsula.

Thanks to Chuck Hantis for his photos from today. Click on the photos for larger images.

White Ibis, Speedwell Lake, Morristown, NJ, Oct. 25, 2017 (photo by Chuck Hantis)

White Ibis, Speedwell Lake, Morristown, NJ, Oct. 25, 2017 (photo by Chuck Hantis)

White Ibis, Speedwell Lake, Morristown, NJ, Oct. 25, 2017 (photo by Chuck Hantis)

White Ibis, Speedwell Lake, Morristown, NJ, Oct. 25, 2017 (photo by Chuck Hantis)


A report of a Northern Shrike at the Great Swamp NWR appeared on eBird yesterday, Oct. 24. The bird was apparently seen in the afternoon but not since. There are photographic reports of Northern Shrikes from Connecticut on Oct. 22 and Massachusettes, Oct. 23-24. The species has been absent in the Morris area since 2012.


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


Posted in Morris County, Somerset County | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

White Ibis in Morristown – Oct. 23, 2017

White Ibis, Speedwell Lake, Morristown, NJ, Oct. 23, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

(Click on the photo for a larger image.)

Look who is back. A White Ibis is actively feeding at Speedwell Lake in Morristown. Speedwell Lake is not regularly visited by birders so the Ibis may have been at the lake all along unbeknownst to the birding public. Nick Russo says he did not see it during a few recent visits.

It is anyone’s guess where this juvenile White Ibis has been frequenting the past six weeks. Of course, that is if one alleges this White Ibis is the same one found by Chuck Hantis and seen by others at Troy Meadows on September 7, 2017 and by Nick Russo at the same Speedwell Lake two days later on September 9.

Speedwell Lake is approximately seven miles in a straight line from the location the White Ibis was seen along Troy Brook on Sept. 7. White Ibis remains a New Jersey Review Species. The NJ Bird Record Committee may consider this to be one and the same White Ibis.

Along with the White Ibis, Speedwell Lake in Morristown has had its modest share of interesting birds over the years: Cackling Goose on a few occasions, Little Blue Heron, Great Egrets can usually be found here into the autumn. Green and Great Blue Herons are regulars during the summer. Ducks are plentiful when the water remains open during the winter months. Various swallow species and Chimney Swifts frequent the lake. Unfortunately, the invasive Water Chestnut (Trapa natans) takes over the lake during the summer.

Speedwell Lake is actually a dammed section of the Whippany River, across Speedwell Avenue from Speedwell Village, Alfred Vail’s historic site. It is a popular park. An asphalt path runs alongside the lake and is part of Morris County’s Patriots Path system.

White Ibis, Speedwell Lake, Morristown, NJ, Oct. 23, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


Posted in Morris County, Somerset County | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Mid-October Birds – Oct. 14, 2017

Swamp Sparrow, Troy Meadows, NJ., NJ, Oct. 14, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

(Click on the photo for a larger image.)

Troy Meadows was thick with Swamp and Song Sparrows this morning. Add Field, White-crowned, White-throated, Vesper, Savannah, and Lincoln’s Sparrows to the mix and it spells Mid-October in northern New Jersey.

Common Yellowthroats, Yellow-rumped and Palm Warblers, Ruby-crowned Kinglets and Northern Harrier were some of the other species typical of this time and place.

Swamp Sparrow, Troy Meadows, NJ., NJ, Oct. 14, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

A Sora flushed near the end of Troy Meadows Rd. today (Jeff Ellerbusch).

Rob Fanning found an extraordinary Grasshopper Sparrow on Oct. 13 along the power line at the south end of Troy Meadows.


Other Birds

American Pipit, Florham Park, NJ, Oct. 14, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Chris Thomas found a group of six American Pipits this morning at Florham Park Fields. Later in the morning, the Pipits went missing but returned later as a group of nine, flying around the field before settling on the gravel section next to the south pond. This is a favored spot for Pipits in the past as well as Vesper Sparrows.

American Pipit, Florham Park, NJ, Oct. 14, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

A preening Pipit.

American Pipit, Florham Park, NJ, Oct. 14, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)


A Red-throated Loon was found at Budd Lake today by Alan Boyd. A Common Loon was found Oct. 12 at Lake Parsippany by Roger Johnson.


Orange-crowned Warblers were reported twice this week from Pleasant Plains Road, Great Swamp NWR: one on Oct. 8 (Marc Chelemer) and another at the overlook on Oct. 12 (Jeff Ellerbusch).


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


Posted in Morris County, Somerset County | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

A Dickcissel closes out the summer – Sep. 22, 2017

The summer of 2017 was generous at the Lincoln Park Gravel Pits where a number of Morris County rarities were found.

The first was the extraordinary Black-necked Stilt of July 28.

The second rarity at The Pits was the first Buff-breasted Sandpiper seen in years in Morris County on August 22.

A third Morris rarity at The Pits was a Snowy Egret on September 16. This followed the possible 7 Snowy Egrets seen on August 1 roosting in trees at the adjacent municipal lake in the evening. Equally remarkable was a Morris record 32 Great Egrets tallied at the same time and place.

Snowy Egret, Lincoln Park Gravel Pits, Morris Co., NJ, Sep. 16, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

(Click on the photo for a larger image.)

Another rarity at The Pits was a surprising Dickcissel found on September 21 by Roger Johnson and yours truly near the southern end of the Lincoln Park Gravel Pits. The Dickcissel kept company with numerous Song Sparrows as well as Lincoln’s, White-throated and Swamp Sparrows, and Common Yellowthroats in every flavor of plumage.

Along with the other typical shorebirds at The Pits this summer, an immature Glossy Ibis and up to three juvenile Little Blue Herons were, and are, at the Pits into September along with the usual Great Blue and Green Herons and Great Egrets.

Ducks are moving in at The Pits. Up to 150 Wood Ducks is possible if one wants to count them. Green-winged and Blue-winged Teal, Northern Shovelers, Gadwall, American Wigeon and other water birds such as Pied-billed Grebe and American Coot are currently present.

This place should be preserved in a formal way. It is a proven bird haven for many decades.


White Ibis

Readers of this blog may recall the report of a White Ibis at Troy Meadows on September 7. It was seen that day only.

Early the next week, mocosocoBirds was informed that a White Ibis was photographed by Nick Russo at Speedwell Lake, Morristown on September 9 and not seen again. Is this the same Ibis? A straight line from Troy Brook to Speedwell Lake is seven miles. We will never know for certain if this is the same individual but it is an interesting addition to the White Ibis invasion of New Jersey in 2017.

Nick has lots of great bird photos at his Full Bleed Photography web site.

White Ibis, Speedwell Lake, Morristown, NJ, Sep. 9, 2017 (photo by Nick Russo)

White Ibis, Speedwell Lake, Morristown, NJ, Sep. 9, 2017 (photo by Nick Russo)


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


Posted in Morris County, Somerset County | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Ron Pittaway’s annual Winter Finch Forecast for 2017-18

Do not expect many boreal species in north New Jersey this winter. Bumper cone crops, or as Ron Pittaways says: “the best cone crop in a decade or more”, will keep most of the winter finches satiated in the north.

Ron Pittaway’s annual Winter Finch Forecast for 2017-18

Good birding,

mocosocoBirds

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Birds, everywhere – Sep. 9, 2019

Here is the precipitation radar from this morning, Saturday, at 5:30 AM. As you can see, the northeast is bone-dry:

And here is the reflectivity radar (i.e. birds) from 5:15 this morning:


This represents an explosion of migrants in the east. Of course, results will vary depending on the location.

The consensus from around the state seems to offer ground truth for the radar image. In other words, migrant birds were everywhere this morning.

Prairie Warbler, Lincoln Park Gravel Pits, Morris Co., NJ, Sep. 9, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

A trip to the Lincoln Park Gravel Pits in search of shorebirds turned up Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs and a pair of Killdeer. No other shorebirds. The continuing Glossy Ibis, Little Blue Herons, 9 Great Egrets, 13 Great Blue Herons and 5 Blue-winged Teal seemed to be the highlights of the morning until a return to the woods showed the earlier radar was on target.

Everywhere one looked, warblers were in the trees. 14 species were tallied in a small section of the woods on the north side of the lake. Multiples of Tennessee, Bay-breasted and Cape May Warblers were easily the highlights. Singletons of many species were present. Other species were missed for sure. Similar scenarios played out at Troy Meadows and Glenhurst Meadows as well.

Tennessee Warbler, Lincoln Park Gravel Pits, Morris Co., NJ, Sep. 9, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

The forecast for Saturday night into Sunday morning is for continued northerly winds. In fact, as this is being written on a Saturday night, the current reflectivity radar looks like this:

See you in the field tomorrow morning.


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


Posted in Morris County, Somerset County | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

White Ibis at Troy Meadows in Morris Co. – Sep. 7, 2017

White Ibis, Troy Meadows, NJ, Sep. 7, 2017 (photo by Chuck Hantis)

(Click on the photo for a larger image.)

Morris County’s third record of White Ibis was found today by Chuck Hantis at Troy Meadows. The juvenile White Ibis was in Troy Brook when Chuck first saw it fly in at approximately 9:30 AM. It was in a section of Troy Brook close to the gas-line cut and Troy Meadows Road.

White Ibis, Troy Meadows, NJ, Sep. 7, 2017 (photo by Chuck Hantis)

It was relocated at 4:30 PM further west along Troy Brook, deeper into the woods, just east of the gas-line. Troy Brook bends and winds through woodland in this area. This is not a place where one expects to find a White Ibis.

White Ibis, Troy Meadows, NJ, Sep. 7, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Fortunately, word got out and a few other birders were able to view the Ibis. This continues a remarkable year in New Jersey for sightings of this species, although all of those records are along the New Jersey coast with Monmouth County being the furthest north until today.

The previous records of White Ibis in Morris County both occurred in the Great Swamp NWR: 1977 and 2009.


Other Birds

Below is a pair of Chuck Hantis’s photos of a Cape May Warbler found at Troy Meadows on Sep. 1, not far from where the White Ibis was first seen today. Please click on the photos for a larger image. It is worth it.

Cape May Warbler, Troy Meadows, NJ, Sep. 1, 2017 (photo by Chuck Hantis)

Cape May Warbler, Troy Meadows, NJ, Sep. 1, 2017 (photo by Chuck Hantis)


This morning, Selody Sod Farm had 3 American Golden Plovers, 171 Killdeer, 2 Pectoral Sandpipers and a Semipalmated Sandpiper (Jeff Ellerbusch).


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


Posted in Morris County, Somerset County | Tagged , , , , , , , | 4 Comments