The 85th Boonton Christmas Bird Count Report – 2020

Common Raven, Morris Twp., Morris Co., NJ, Dec. 27, 2020 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

The 85th annual Boonton Christmas Bird Count (CBC) occurred on Sunday, December 27, 2020. The temperature at dawn was 19°F and climbed to 35°F in the afternoon. Beautifully clear skies made for a comfortable day in the field for the 40 participants.

The mild temperatures and heavy rain of December 23-24 melted the earlier snowfall clearing the ground. Most water sources were ice-free.

86 species were tallied along with two count-week additions. 

The two count-week species, Northern Saw-whet Owl and Northern Harrier, are part of the record although not included in the official totals for the count day submitted to the National Audubon CBC data center (count-week is defined as three days prior to and three days after the actual count date).

13,463 individual birds were tallied. While historically low, the average for the previous three years (2017-19) is 13,156.

Highlights for this year’s CBC are below. All high counts refer to the Boonton CBC:

  • Winter finches lingered long enough to be tallied in 2020. Common Redpoll, Pine Siskin, Red Crossbill, and one lone Red-breasted Nuthatch are included this year.
  • A record number of 14 Bald Eagles smashed the previous record of 10.
  • 23 Pileated Woodpeckers is a new record. 18 in 2016 was the previous high. From 1936 to 1968, Pileateds were rare with singletons only and mostly none reported. 
  • 146 Buffleheads is second only to the 221 tallied in 2006.
  • For the second year in a row, a high count of 12 Common Ravens was counted.
  • 130 Carolina Wrens is an 85-year record.
  • 22 Winter Wrens is the second-highest total to the 23 of 1998.
  • You may notice a few more vultures floating around this season. 86 Turkey Vultures is the most since 2012, and 58 Black Vultures is the most since 2015. 
  • 11 Red-shouldered Hawks is the highest total since…13 in 1954. The 85-year average is 3.
  • 80 Red-tailed Hawks is an improvement over recent years and the most since 2008.
  • American Kestrel (1), Merlin (2), and Peregrine Falcon (1) were all represented.
  • Eastern Screech-Owl spots must be well-known to the pre-dawn owlers. The past three years have totals of 23, 22, and 22.
  • 21 Belted Kingfishers is the second-highest total since 2002.
  • 1 Wilson’s Snipe is the first since 2014. Snipe were almost annual until recent years. The high count was 29 in 1979. 22 were counted as recently as 2010.
  • Black-capped Chickadees doubled their totals from the previous three years. 170 in 2020; 59, 78, and 82 from 2017-19 respectively.
  • 18 Brown Creepers is the most since 2012 and the second-highest since 1996.
  • Eastern Bluebirds (47) had their second-highest total since 2008. The 21st-century average is 33.
  • Wild Turkeys were first recorded in 1983 and not again until 1988 where they have been annually tallied uninterrupted through 2020.
  • 10 Common Goldeneyes is the highest count since 10 in 1996. 
  • 3 Chipping Sparrows make this three out of four years for this uncommon species on the CBC.

33 species were above their 21st-Century average. Of course, this means that 53 species were below their 21st-century average. 40 were above average in 2019. 

Other news:

  • American Wigeon was missed for the fourth time in six years after a streak of 25 years of being counted.
  • Eastern Towhee had their second-highest total in 2019 with 35. In 2020: zero, only the second miss since 1968 other than a count-week tally.
  • Gray Catbird: third miss in five years after a string of almost annual records since the 1970s.
  • 1 Red-breasted Nuthatch was a nice find, especially since it was missed in three of the previous five years. It was annual from 1968-2014 often with double-digit totals. Think of this: 58 Red-breasted Nuthatches in 1981.
  • Zero Red-headed Woodpeckers were found. So it goes with this cyclical species. 25 were counted in 2019.
  • What does one make of the roller-coaster swings of the Red-bellied Woodpecker population? The following four years are typical since 2010. Similar trends can be found with the other woodpecker species as well.
Year total
2020 82
2019 243
2018 142
2017 51
  • 173 Blue Jays is the lowest total since 173 in 1988.

The following species were seen by one party only. The species column is followed by the amount reported. The third column represents the percentage of occurrences in the 85-year history of the count:

Seen by only one party
Species Tot. % on CBC Comment
Northern Pintail 4 69.4 Seen every year since 1998, usually in low numbers
Redhead 8 48.2 Usually found somewhere on the CBC.
Pied-billed Grebe 4 76.5 Only three misses since 1965.
American Kestrel 1 88.2 Was annual from 1936-98; sporadic since.
Peregrine Falcon 1 21.2 First occurred on the count in 1997.
Wilson’s Snipe 1 62.4 Formerly fairly regular, now rare on the CBC.
Red-breasted Nuthatch 1 71.8 Annual from 1968-2014.
Ruby-crowned Kinglet 1 72.9 Only two misses since 1970. 
Chipping Sparrow 3 28.2 2nd year in a row.
Savannah Sparrow 1 72.9 Three misses since 1971.
Brown-headed Cowbird 5 82.4 In keeping with low numbers of Icterids.
Purple Finch 4 91.8 Annual from 1966-2014. Twice missed plus a count-week species since then.

The following table shows notable species missed in 2020 that appear <50% in the history of the count. 

Species Missed % on CBC Comment
Canvasback 60.0 Not reported since 2016, formerly regular.
Lesser Scaup 51.8 Missed three out of four years.
Ruffed Grouse 60.0 Not seen since 2006.
Northern Harrier 81.2 Tallied as a count-week species this year.
Rough-legged Hawk 55.3 Not surprising.
Killdeer 63.5 Missed three out of four years.
Great Black-backed Gull 64.7 First complete miss since 1968, with one count-week year included in that period.
Long-eared Owl 61.2 Tallied only once in the past six years.
Eastern Towhee 78.8 35 in 2019; none in 2020.

 Historical Items

Below is the list of species occurring in all 85 years of the Boonton CBC. This has not changed since 2018:

  • American Black Duck
  • Mallard
  • Red-tailed Hawk
  • Downy Woodpecker
  • Hairy Woodpecker
  • Blue Jay
  • American Crow
  • Black-capped Chickadee
  • Tufted Titmouse
  • White-breasted Nuthatch
  • Brown Creeper
  • European Starling
  • American Tree Sparrow
  • Song Sparrow
  • Swamp Sparrow
  • White-throated Sparrow
  • Dark-eyed (Slate-colored) Junco
  • Northern Cardinal
  • American Goldfinch
  • House Sparrow

Here is the top ten of the number of individuals for all 85 years of the count. No change in the order from last year:

  Species Total Individuals (85 years)
1 European Starling 209,737
2 Canada Goose 170,100
3 Common Grackle 128,030
4 American Crow 125,776
5 Mallard 64,713
6 Dark-eyed (Slate-colored) Junco 56,825
7 American Tree Sparrow 53,530
8 Red-winged Blackbird 43,918
9 Ring-billed Gull 39,705
10 House Sparrow 38,860

Mark your calendars. Next year’s count will be on Sunday, December 26, 2021.

This report is also at the following location on the mocosocoBirds.com web site:

https://mocosocobirds.com/birds-of-morris-county-n-j/boontoncbc/2020-2/

A list of the species found on this CBC is at the following link:

https://mocosocobirds.com/birds-of-morris-county-n-j/boontoncbc/species-list/

You can also access these pages through the Birds of Morris County > Boonton Christmas Bird Count menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com web site.

A wonderful 2021 to all!

Nature and Art, nothing else matters.

Jonathan Klizas, Compiler

Boonton Christmas Bird Count

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Nelson’s Sparrow in Parsippany – Oct. 3, 2020

Nelson’s Sparrow, Parsippany, NJ, Oct. 3, 2020 (photo by Steve Kolb)

Late in the day on Saturday, October 3, 2020, Steve Kolb was across from the Hyatt Hotel near the intersection of Jefferson and Smith Roads in Parsippany. This is the area of the eBird hotspot, Jefferson Rd. Pond. A black morph of the Eastern Gray Squirrel caught Steve’s attention and he attempted to get a photograph of it.

The previous night’s heavy migration dumped an impressive bounty of birds in the Morris area. As Steve was trying for a squirrel photo, one particular bird piqued Steve’s curiosity and he fired off a number of photos of the Ammospiza species he was seeing.

By late Sunday morning, mocosocoBirds was made aware of the find. A few people looked but the Nelson’s Sparrow was not relocated.

This is the first documented Nelson’s Sparrow for Morris County that mocosocoBirds is aware of. It already appears on the county list but without annotation.

Steve’s photos are stunning. Take a look at his Flickr page, here.

Nelson’s Sparrow, Parsippany, NJ, Oct. 3, 2020 (photo by Steve Kolb)
Nelson’s Sparrow, Parsippany, NJ, Oct. 3, 2020 (photo by Steve Kolb)
Nelson’s Sparrow, Parsippany, NJ, Oct. 3, 2020 (photo by Steve Kolb)

The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted as they occur. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.

The New Jersey Bird Records Committee web site is here and contains the list of accepted records, the list of review species, and annual reports.

Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology’s Birds of the World online encyclopedia is here.


Finis



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Red Phalarope at Lake Parsippany; other records of interest – Sep. 26, 2020

Red Phalarope, Lake Parsippany, Morris Co., NJ, Sept. 26, 2020 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Lake Parsippany does not qualify as a pelagic destination but for reasons best reserved for the species themselves to divulge, a Red Phalarope, one of the most ocean-faring of shorebird species, spent the day at the southern end of the lake, viewed by many observers.

Separating the three phalarope species (Red, Red-necked, and Wilson’s) can be a daunting task in fall migration. Credit goes to Sean Ondich for finding and initially identifying the bird and to Rob Fanning for broadcasting the finding on the local rare bird text alerts.

Jeff Ellerbusch describes this particular individual as a “hatch-year Red Phalarope pretty far along into first pre-basic molt.” The phalarope’s identification was in question for a while this afternoon based on in-person observation and photo study as the bird showed conflicting characteristics of both Red and Red-necked Phalaropes.

In the end, Red Phalarope won out over Red-necked. Jeff heard a diagnostic high-pitched call which helped to clinch the identification. Also, Red Phalarope juveniles are further along in their molt cycle than Red-necked Phalaropes at this time of the year.

This is a historic sighting. As far as is known, this is the first record of a Red Phalarope in Morris County since September 1, 1990, when one was located at Boonton Reservoir by two giants in the history of New Jersey birding, Rich Kane and Tom Halliwell. That is thirty years and twenty-five days ago. Tom also has the only other known Red Phalarope record for Morris County from Lake Musconetcong on August 12, 1982.

Red Phalarope, Lake Parsippany, Morris Co., NJ, Sept. 26, 2020 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)


American Golden-Plover in Morris County

Another sighting that has historic value for Morris County, is the American Golden-Plover found and photographed by Clint Robinson on September 21 at Freund Park, Roxbury Township. This is also known as Horseshoe Lake and is the trailhead for the West Morris Greenway. This is the first known record for this species in Morris County since David Harrison found one at the same location on September 28, 1989.

American Golden-Plover, Roxbury Twp., Morris Co., NJ, Sep. 21, 2020 (photo by Clint Robinson)

American Golden-Plover, Roxbury Twp., Morris Co., NJ, Sep. 21, 2020 (photo by Clint Robinson)


July Record of White-crowned Sparrow in New Jersey

Interesting rarities have appeared in New Jersey during the past few months dominating the state’s birding attention.

A local Somerset County sighting flew under the radar on July 24. Doryce Wheeler photographed a White-crowned Sparrow in her Bridgewater yard. The significance of this? There are no known records of White-crowned Sparrow in New Jersey for July…or August. Even June records are rare. Late September is the earliest this species arrives in the state. Quite a remarkable find in this unforgettable year of 2020.

White-crowned Sparrow, Bridgewater, Somerset Co., NJ, July 24, 2020 (photo by Doryce Wheeler)

White-crowned Sparrow, Bridgewater, Somerset Co., NJ, July 24, 2020 (photo by Doryce Wheeler)


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted as they occur. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


The New Jersey Bird Records Committee web site is here and contains the list of accepted records, the list of review species, and annual reports.


Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology’s Birds of the World online encyclopedia is here.


Finis


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Mourning Warbler Gallery – May 28, 2020

Mourning Warbler, Troy Meadows, NJ, May 26, 2020 (photo by Chuck Hantis)

(Click on the photo for a larger image.)

The secretive, skulking Mourning Warbler (Geothlypis philadelphia) is difficult to view during its spring migration from Central and South America on its journey to boreal breeding habitats and even more problematic in posing long enough to get a usable photograph.

Chuck Hantis captured this species in different poses on May 26, 2020, along Troy Meadows Road in the Troy Meadows Natural Area. Three of his photos are presented here. You can see more of Chuck’s extraordinary photographs at his Flickr site.

Mourning Warbler, Troy Meadows, NJ, May 26, 2020 (photo by Chuck Hantis)

In recent years, Troy Meadows Road has become as much of a reliable Mourning Warbler stopover as any. The time frame of its appearance since 2014 falls within May 19-31, occasionally with multiple individuals observed. A streak of ten consecutive days of sightings of this species occurred between May 22-31 in 2019.

Two Mourning Warblers were seen as recent as May 26, 2020. Ironically, a Vermilion Flycatcher was visiting another part of Troy Meadows on that same day viewed and photographed by a fortunate kayaker and not seen since (see that post here).

Mourning Warbler, Troy Meadows, NJ, May 26, 2020 (photo by Chuck Hantis)


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted as they occur. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


The New Jersey Bird Records Committee web site is here and contains the list of accepted records, the list of review species, and annual reports.


Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology’s Birds of the World online encyclopedia is here.


Finis


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Vermilion Flycatcher at Troy Meadows, May 26, 2020

Vermilion Flycatcher, Troy Meadows, Morris Co., NJ, May 26, 2020 (photo by Ted O’Reilly)

(Click on the photo for a larger image at Cornell’s Macaulay Library)

The vestiges of prehistoric Lake Passaic are having a western flycatcher fest this season. First, a Say’s Phoebe spent a morning at the Great Swamp NWR on April 23. See that post here.

Yesterday, May 26, a Vermilion Flycatcher was seen and photographed by a kayaker at Troy Meadows. If accepted by the New Jersey Bird Records Committee, this represents the fifth state record for New Jersey and the first inland. The previous four records are Stone Harbor in May of 2002, Cape May October 2014, and two in 2019, September 25 in Cape May, and October 5 at Sandy Hook.

Ted O’Reilly was kayaking from the Passaic River to the Rockaway River and then the Whippany River crossing under I-280. He then made the right turn onto Troy Brook where the Vermilion Flycatcher was found. Fortunately, he was able to capture the moment with a camera.

Vermilion Flycatcher, Troy Meadows, Morris Co., NJ, May 26, 2020 (photo by Ted O’Reilly)


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted as they occur. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


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State Parks were overrun on May 2. Stay close to home. Be smart!

Be safe. More importantly – BE SMART!

This message is from the State of New Jersey’s Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Parks and Forestry.

See the list of state parks below that were overrun with people on Saturday, May 2.

REMEMBER, COVID-19 IS NOT GONE

In order to KEEP PARKS OPEN and all visitors a safe distance from one another ⚠️ visit close to home, ⚠️ mask up, and ⚠️ make your stay short.

THESE LOCATIONS WERE OVERRUN YESTERDAY
🚨 Barnegat Lighthouse State Park
🚨 Bulls Island Recreation Area
🚨 Delaware & Raritan Canal State Park
🚨 Hacklebarney State Park
🚨 Round Valley Recreation Area
🚨 Wharton State Forest
🚨 Wawayanda State Park
🚨 Worthington State Forest

⚠️CONSIDER VISITING ELSEWHERE TODAY⚠️

Learn social distancing tips in our video: https://youtu.be/x4hc2d0ZKAM

UPDATES ON COVID-19 in NJ
Learn more about COVID-19 in New Jersey: http://covid19.nj.gov/

NJ residents can call 211 with questions or concerns about COVID-19 and to learn resources available to them.

Residents can also text NJCOVID to 898-211 to subscribe to text message updates on NJ COVID-19.
New Jersey Division of Parks & Forestry

Posted in Morris County, Somerset County | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Say’s Phoebe at Great Swamp NWR – April 23, 2020

Say’s Phoebe, Great Swamp NWR, Morris Co., NJ, Apr. 23, 2020 (photo by Chuck Hantis)

Thanks to Chuck Hantis for the above photo.

This morning, Marc Chelemer located, photographed, and spread the word that a Say’s Phoebe was in a field at the Great Swamp NWR. The Say’s Phoebe was in the field along Wood Duck Way near the refuge entrance on Lees Hill Road in Harding Township.

This represents the second Morris County record for this species. In fact, Morris and Somerset Counties have three of the past eight Say’s Phoebe’s records in New Jersey since 2011. The other five records are split between Cape May and Monmouth counties. That is nice geographical company to be associated with. This assumes the New Jersey Bird Records Committee accepts today’s record. Based on the many photos of today’s Say’s Phoebe, it looks like an easy decision for the committee to make.

Two previous spring records of Say’s Phoebe exist in the annals of accepted records of the New Jersey Bird Records Committee. The first was at Garret Mountain, April 16, 2003, and the last was in Cape May, April 30-May 1, 2009. Today, April 23, adds a third spring record splitting it right down the middle between the previous two April dates. Other than the spring records and a wintering Say’s Phoebe in 1956, all of the other New Jersey records are from September through November. Today’s record will make a total of 24 for the state.

Many observers were able to practice social distancing (enough of Covid-19 is written elsewhere) to see this western vagrant flycatching and perching on low vegetation. This, of course, adds a new species to the refuge list.

Say’s Phoebe, Great Swamp NWR, Morris Co., NJ, Apr. 23, 2020 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

How many Say’s Phoebes have ventured to the northeast in 2020? There are two winter records from Vermont, of all places. An April 12 record from an airfield near Cleveland, Ohio, and two records from earlier in April near the west shore of Lake Michigan round out the other listings. Today’s Great Swamp record is it for the region as of today. Here is a Say’s Phoebe map for 2020 generated from eBird data today. The blue markers represent beyond thirty days from today and the red markers within thirty days.

Below is the typical range of this species courtesy of Cornel Laboratory of Ornithology’s Birds of the World.

Here are links to New Jersey Bird Records Committee web pages and files of interest.

Lists and Annual Reports Scroll down for annual reports from 1992-2019.

New Jersey State List – All bird species recorded in the state

List of Accepted Records of Rare Birds in New Jersey

New Jersey Review List – Bird species reviewable by the NJBRC

A poor photo below, but a look at the underside of the Say’s Phoebe as it lifted off of a perch. Apparently, it was not seen after approximately 12:30-1:00 PM.

Say’s Phoebe, Great Swamp NWR, Morris Co., NJ, Apr. 23, 2020 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted as they occur. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


Posted in Morris County, Somerset County | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Redheads, and the 2019 NJ Bald Eagle Report – Jan. 16, 2020

Redhead, Lake Parsippany, Morris Co., NJ, Jan. 16, 2020 (photo by Chuck Hantis)

(Click on the photo for a larger image.)

After a sparse waterfowl season, wintering ducks are starting to inhabit the lakes of the region. Chuck Hantis had at least eight Redheads and a pair of Canvasbacks at Lake Parsippany today. Two Redheads were there earlier in the week along with eight Northern Shovelers. Chuck’s beautiful Redhead photos appear on this page. His Flickr page is here and is worth a look.

Redheads, Lake Parsippany, Morris Co., NJ, Jan. 16, 2020 (photo by Chuck Hantis)


The 2019 New Jersey Bald Eagle Project Report is here. 249 young were produced at 184 known-outcome nests in the entire state.

Bald Eagle reports going back to 2003 can be found here.


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted as they occur. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


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The Emerald Ash Borer and Morris County Parks – Jan. 11, 2020

Fallen Ash Trees, Central Park of Morris Co., NJ, Jan. 11, 2020 (iPhone photo by Jonathan Klizas)

On December 22, a team of Boonton Christmas Bird Count (CBC) participants visited Central Park of Morris County, the former Greystone Park property. See a prior post about the park here. Nothing seemed out of the ordinary that day. The park looked like it had during the autumn.

Today, January 11, 2020, was this writer’s first visit to the park since the CBC. The first difference noticed was that most of the fields were mowed. The same cut took place the previous winter. The fields grow back. In fact, the stand of Common Milkweed was outstanding this past summer.

Walking along the path on the West Hanover Ave. side of the park revealed an entirely different scene. Dozens upon dozens of cut ash trees were piled up horizontally on the ground. The photo at the top of this page represents a small section of the ash tree removal procedure. It is the result of the Morris County Park Commissions’s Emerald Ash Borer Response Plan, the content of which can be read here.

Fallen Ash Trees, Central Park of Morris County, Parsippany-Troy Hills, NJ, Jan. 11, 2020 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

According to the county park website, Morris County has the highest density of ash trees in the state of New Jersey. 12,000 trees are already tagged to date. Trees in high use areas will be removed. In select locations, the Morris County Park Commission is utilizing trunk injections of insecticides to protect select ash trees.

The county park web site gives a sense of the Emerald Ash Borer’s destruction: it has killed hundreds of millions of ash trees in North America and is considered to be the most destructive and expensive insect ever to invade the United States.

It seems appropriate to show some woodpecker photos from today. The Yellow-bellied Sapsucker and Downy Woodpecker are from Central Park of Morris County. The Hairy Woodpecker is from a different Central Park in Whippany. Click on the photos for a larger image.

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, Central Park of Morris County, Parsippany-Troy Hills, NJ, Jan. 11, 2020 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Downy Woodpecker, Central Park of Morris County, Parsippany-Troy Hills, NJ, Jan. 11, 2020 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Hairy Woodpecker, Central Park, Whippany, Morris Co., NJ, Jan. 11, 2020 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted as they occur. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


Posted in Historical, Morris County, Somerset County | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Updated Totals for 2019 Boonton CBC: 96 Species

The compiler missed a checklist. The total species count is now 96. The completely updated 2019 Boonton CBC report is at the same link as when it was originally posted:

https://mocosocobirds.com/2019/12/24/the-84th-boonton-christmas-bird-count-report-2019/

The same report is here:
https://mocosocobirds.com/birds-of-morris-county-n-j/boontoncbc/2019-2/

Reports going back to 2012 are in the sub-menu of Birds of Morris County->Boonton Christmas Bird Count


finis


Posted in Christmas Bird Count, Historical, Morris County | Tagged , , , , , , , | Leave a comment