Birds of August – Aug. 19, 2017

Birds at the Lincoln Park Gravel Pits

The Lincoln Park Gravel Pits (“The Pits”) continues to be the most reliable shorebird location in Morris County. In the summer of 2017, it is practically the only shorebird habitat in Morris due to frequent rains that have filled most bodies of water and inundated any other suitable habitat.

This morning, Roger Johnson and this observer were able to find a Glossy Ibis, Little Blue Heron, and continuing shorebirds including Semipalmated Plovers, Killdeer, Least, Pectoral, Spotted and Solitary Sandpipers, and Lesser Yellowlegs. Other species included Great Blue Herons, Great Egrets, Green Herons, and many Wood Ducks.

The Glossy Ibis is the first reported in Morris County since May 2014.

Glossy Ibis, Lincoln Park Gravel Pits, Morris Co., NJ, Aug. 19, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

(Click on the photo for a larger image.)

Glossy Ibis, Lincoln Park Gravel Pits, Morris Co., NJ, Aug. 19, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

The juvenile Little Blue Heron brings back memories of 2014 when up to five young Little Blue Herons spent August at The Pits at the same time that seven were at the Melanie Lane Wetlands in Hanover Twp., an unprecedented occurrence in Morris County.

Little Blue Heron, Lincoln Park Gravel Pits, Morris Co., NJ, Aug. 19, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

The previously mentioned shorebirds have spent at least the past week moving from one feeding area to another. Six Semipalmated Plovers were seen in one group at The Pits this morning.

Semipalmated Plover, Lincoln Park Gravel Pits, Morris Co., NJ, Aug. 14, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Killdeer and Pectoral Sandpiper, Lincoln Park Gravel Pits, Morris Co., NJ, Aug. 14, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Green Herons are numerous at The Pits and probably go undetected more than they are counted. As much as the despised invasive Water Chestnut (Trapa natans) has blanketed most of the main lake at The Pits, the birds seem to thrive on it. Wood Ducks, Cedar Waxwings, Green Herons, and other species actively feed in the green mat. It is doubtful any remediation of this invasive species will be undertaken at this location.

Green Heron, Lincoln Park Gravel Pits, Morris Co., NJ, Aug. 19, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

As if a Black-necked Stilt on July 28 was not enough of a memorable sighting at The Pits, the evening of August 1 saw the most remarkable display of egrets ever witnessed and documented in Morris County.

Joseph Campolo saw and photographed, as best he could, thirty-two Great Egrets and seven Snowy Egrets roosting in trees at the municipal lake adjacent to the main lake of The Pits. Both totals are easily the highest ever recorded in Morris County.

Egrets in Lincoln Park, NJ, Aug. 1, 2017 (photo by Joesph Campolo)

Most likely, the egrets came over from the Walker Avenue Wetlands. The Lincoln Park Gravel Pits is across the Pompton River from the Walker Avenue Wetlands in Passaic County. Both places are worth a visit if time permits.


Black Tern in Somerset County

A Black Tern was present at a Superfund site in Bridgewater on August 12 (Jeff Ellerbusch), the fourth known Somerset County record.

Black Tern, Bridgewater, NJ, Aug. 12, 2017 (documentation photo by Jeff Ellerbusch)


Other Birds

An Olive-sided Flycatcher was reported from Troy Meadows this past week along Troy Meadows Road on Aug. 17 and 18 (Rob Fanning, Chris Williams).

A male Blue Grosbeak was seen and described at Kay Environmental Center, Chester on Aug. 18 (Frank Durso).


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


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Black-necked Stilt in Morris Co., – July 28, 2017

Black-necked Stilt, Lincoln Park Gravel Pits, July 28, 2017 (photo by Alan Boyd)

Yesterday, July 28, Roger Johnson made another of his many trips to the Lincoln Park Gravel Pits over the last three-plus decades. The Pits is the most reliable shorebird spot in Morris, depending on water levels and this is the time of year to look.

Not content with the usual Least Sandpipers and Lesser Yellowlegs, even a Semipalmated Sandpiper is a nice find in Morris, Roger sighted one of the most remarkable species seen in the county in recent memory, and the first in Morris, a Black-necked Stilt.

Fortunately, Roger texted the finding to a local notification network and the word spread from there. Other birders were able to observe it and photograph this rare north New Jersey visitor.

According to the eBird database, the only other Black-necked Stilt records from New Jersey north of Monmouth County, are from the Meadowlands area and DeKorte Park. The Monmouth records include one near Holmdel in 2005 and Wreck Pond in 2003. All other New Jersey records are from Forsythe NWR (“Brig”) and south from there along the coast.


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


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Summer Birds at Deerhaven Lake – July 21, 2017

Deerhaven Lake, Morris Co., NJ, July 21, 2017 (iPhone Pano by Jonathan Klizas)

(Click on any of the photos for a larger image.)

Deerhaven Lake is simply a gem of northern Morris County and one of this writer’s favorite locations. Besides one of the most picturesque heronries anywhere in New Jersey, it also has breeding Common Gallinules, Pied-billed Grebes, numerous Wood Ducks and apparently, as three intrepid observers saw today, Least Bitterns along with the many other species typical of this wetlands habitat.

Deerhaven Lake is part of the Newark Watershed. A hiking permit is required to enter the area and can be acquired at the watershed office on Echo Lake Road north of Route 23. Be aware that shotgun-blasting hunters have been observed here during hunting season. Also, be aware there are no trails, per se. It is the classic mocosocoBirds “you are on your own” location.

Common Gallinules, Deerhaven Lake, Morris Co., NJ, July 21, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

A family of six Common Gallinules was observed as long as one wanted to this morning (see the photo above). While watching the family activities, a different Common Gallinule was heard calling from another direction for a total of at least seven.

Common Gallinules, Deerhaven Lake, Morris Co., NJ, July 21, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

The family hauled out on a partially submerged log and were unwary of three Homo sapiens relatively close by.

Common Gallinules, Deerhaven Lake, Morris Co., NJ, July 21, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

This species has impressively sized toes in relation to the rest of its body.

Common Gallinule, Deerhaven Lake, Morris Co., NJ, July 21, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

An interesting feature was noticed on the adults that the observers in attendance cannot recall having seen before, probably because most birders do not get the chance to see Common Gallinules walking in shallow water very often, if at all.

Look at the photo below and note the red bands at the top of the bird’s tibias (upper legs) just below the thigh feathers. Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology’s Birds of North America refers to this band as a”garter of scarlet” (how fashionable). These are present only in the adults. As with all of the photos in this post, click on one to get a larger image in a separate tab or window.

Incidentally, that is not a headless juvenile to the right of the adult. The youth has its head turned to the side.

Common Gallinule, Deerhaven Lake, Morris Co., NJ, July 21, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Sharp-eyed Louis Bizzarro picked out two Least Bitterns in flight just over Phragmites in the distance. Rob Fanning was able to see one soon thereafter and this observer, as well as Louis, saw a Least Bittern straddling some Phragmites stalks before disappearing. This is the first known sighting of this species at this location, although not surprising considering the habitat.

A Pied-billed Grebe was seen and later heard calling. This is a nesting species at Deerhaven Lake. See an August 2016 post for a photo of a family of Pied-billed Grebes out on the lake.

Many of the Great Blue Herons from this magnificent heronry have dispersed, although twenty-plus Great Blue Herons continue to feed at the lake.

Great Blue Herons, Deerhaven Lake, Morris Co., NJ, July 21, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


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Gull-billed Tern, Common Gallinule – June 16, 2017

Gull-billed Tern at Great Swamp NWR

One of the most extraordinary bird sightings of recent memory in Morris County occurred this morning as a group of birders watched and documented a Gull-billed Tern at the Great Swamp NWR.

The Gull-billed Tern was viewed from the Freinds Blind at the Wildlife Observation Center on Long Hill Road. The eBird checklist submitted by Andrea Robbins contains text documentation and photos.

The comment section of the eBird checklist is a model of the pertinent aspects a first observer should document of the sighting when submitting a checklist of a local mega rarity. Besides mentioning the important field marks of the subject bird, the observer also gave details as to why other species were eliminated. The link to the checklist is here.


Common Gallinule at Duke Farms

Common Gallinule, Duke Farms, Hillsborough Twp., NJ, June 15, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Since found on June 7 by Louise Wilkens, a Common Gallinule inhabits Wood Duck Lake at Duke Farms and continues to be seen as of today. This is a special sighting as few of this species occur in Somerset County and none before this record are thoroughly documented.


Clay-colored Sparrow at Six Mile Run

Clay-colored Sparrow, Franklin Twp., NJ, June 11, 2017 (photo by Jeff Ellerbusch)

The Clay-colored Sparrow at Six Mile Run was last reported on June 11 but it is not known if anyone specifically tried to find it since then. Jeff Ellerbusch has an excellent field recording of the Clay-colored Sparrow’s song. The link for that recording is here.


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


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Clay-colored Sparrow in Somerset Co. – June 5, 2017

Clay-colored Sparrow, Franklin Twp., NJ, June 5, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

(Click on the photo for a larger image.)

Susan Treesh found a Clay-colored Sparrow on Sunday, June 4 near the blue trail in the fields of Six Mile Run, Franklin Twp. The sparrow continues today in the same area. Ray Duffy supplies accurate coordinates for viewing the bird: 40.477759,-74.562553.

Clay-colored Sparrow (CCSP) is a rare spring visitor to New Jersey, especially inland. The Six Mile Run CCSP sings its 2-3 part buzz “song” every few minutes, at least while this observer was present. An example of the song was recorded by Jeff Ellerbusch on June 4. That recording is here.

Clay-colored Sparrow, Franklin Twp., NJ, June 4, 2017 (photo by Chris Thomas)

Six Mile Run is part of the Delaware and Raritan Canal State Park. It contains over 3,000 acres of what once was planned as a reservoir and is now grassland and forest habitat instead. Besides a virtual plethora of Field Sparrows, the area also has Grasshopper Sparrows, Willow Flycatcher and other species typical of the area. Negri-Nepote Native Grassland Preserve is nearby making this section of Somerset County an excellent location to get one’s fill of Grasshopper Sparrows, Blue Grosbeaks, et al.


Lesser Nighthawk: gone

Somerset County’s other glamourous avian vagrant, the Lesser Nighthawk of Lord Stirling Park, has not been seen since Friday evening, June 2.

More than 130 people used eBird to document the Lesser Nighthawk. Many others visited the Nighthawk as well making for an impressive gathering of birders over the course of eight days.


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


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Prothonotary Warbler, Gulls, Lesser Nighthawk – May 31, 2017

Prothonotary Warbler at Lord Stirling Park

Prothonotary Warbler, Lord Stirling Park, NJ, May 29, 2017 (photo by Chuck Hantis)

(Click on the photo for a larger image.)

The Prothonotary Warbler (PROW) at Lord Stirling Park is usually seen carrying nesting material on visits to the nest box. This is viewed from the enclosed blind on the west side of Branta Pond. From personal and other accounts, this PROW has never been heard or seen singing. These are clues to the gender of this individual even without a plumage discussion.

Prothonotary Warbler, Lord Stirling Park, NJ, May 29, 2017 (photo by Chuck Hantis)

The following excerpt is from Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology’s Birds of North America: “Only female builds nest, although male often places foundation of moss in cavity during territory establishment…Males establish territories shortly after spring arrival, through intense and frequent vocalization and aggression against other males. Territory is centered on ≥1 nest cavities in which males place up to 8 cm of moss.”

Based on that criteria, the PROW in the photographs is a female as it has clearly been seen carrying twigs, grasses and other nesting materials but never moss. For a comparison, this observer watched a male PROW at the Lincoln Park Gravel Pits in May, 2016. It sang continuously only stopping to gather mossy material and placing it in one or two tree cavities. Unfortunately, it apparently never found a mate. This corroborates the Birds of North America statement.

Prothonotary Warbler, Lincoln Park Gravel Pits, NJ, May 21, 2016 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)


Gulls in Somerset County

Lesser Black-backed Gulls, Hillsborough Twp., NJ, May 30, 2017 (photo by Jeff Ellerbusch)

New Jersey ornithological history is being made in Somerset County. 145 Lesser Black-backed Gulls were at Opie Road on May 31 (Jeff Ellerbusch). As far as is known, this high a total has never been recorded this late in spring before in New Jersey.

This group is made up of mostly 1st through 3rd cycle gulls and have been present in varying numbers throughout the spring. The gulls wander between the Norz Farm Fields and Opie Road. Lately, they are absent early in the morning bringing up the question: where do they go? The Hunterdon County reservoirs, Round Valey and Spruce Run, are likely answers, possibly Merill Creek in Warren County, but no observations from there are recorded.

40 Ring-billed Gulls were with the Lesser Black-backed Gulls on May 30. Semipalmated Plovers have been observed there recently. Jeff also had an alternate plumaged Black-bellied Plover at Opie Road on May 30. This is a rare bird for Somerset County (and an even rarer species in Morris County).

Black-bellied Plover with Ring-billed and Lesser Black-backed Gulls, Hillsborough Twp., May 30, 2017 (photo by Jeff Ellerbusch)


The Lesser Nighthawk of Lord Stirling Park

Lesser Nighthawk, Lord Stirling Park, Somerset Co., NJ, May 27, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

The Lesser Nighthawk (LENI) continues to inhabit Lord Stirling Park. Last evening, this observer was present when the LENI lifted off at 20:08 and hunted over Esox Pond before disappearing out of sight. It was a treat to see the LENI in flight rather than the roosting pose, as in the above photo, familiar to the many people who come to view this southwestern vagrant.

The news came through the birding texting services today that The Raptor Trust was planning to capture the LENI and relocate it. The latest word mocosocoBirds knows of is that this plan is shelved for now and that The Raptor Trust will wait and see for a week. Hopefully, The Raptor Trust will let nature take its course and not try to move the LENI once again.


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


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Prothonotary Warbler, Lesser Nighthawk at Lord Stirling Park – May 29, 2017

Prothonotary Warbler at Lord Stirling Park

Prothonotary Warbler, Lord Stirling Park, Somerset Co., NJ, May 29, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

(Click on the photo for a larger image.)

The Lesser Nighthawk of Lord Stirling Park is the object of attention in the area since May 26. However, it is not the only avian attraction at Somerset County’s Environmental Education Center. A Prothonotary Warbler on the west side of Branta Pond is also giving excellent photo opportunities for its admirers.

The Prothonotary Warbler (PROW) was found on May 26 by Kirsten Abildskov and Piper Weldy. It is viewed from the enclosed blind on the west side of Branta Pond next to Bullfrog Pond where Yellow-breasted Chats have been observed in recent years (but not this year).

Four bluebird boxes are viewable from the blind. Three are inhabited by noisy House Wrens. The fourth, the farthest on the right when viewed from the blind, is being used by the PROW as it is seen carrying nesting material throughout the day. It will disappear from view for extended periods, 15-20 minutes or so, before returning with more nesting material.

Does the PROW have a mate? None have been observed yet. Prothonotary Warblers have frequently nested in recent years along the Passaic River separating Lord Stirling Park from the Great Swamp NWR. In most years, this is as far north as Prothonotary Warblers nest in New Jersey.

Prothonotary Warbler, Lord Stirling Park, Somerset Co., NJ, May 29, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)


The Lesser Nighthawk Continues

Lesser Nighthawk, Lord Stirling Park, Somerset Co., NJ, May 27, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

People continue to visit Lord Stirling Park to view the remarkably cooperative Lesser Nighthawk (LENI). Every day, the LENI roosts in the same spot at the edge of the main path near the kiosk. Cones are set up to alert walkers to avoid that area. What is this LENI’s story and how long will it continue its routine at Lord Stirling Park?

Here is the history of this bird as far as we know as compiled by Jeff Ellerbusch and edited by mocosocoBirds:

The Lesser Nighthawk was originally found and photographed the morning of May 26 by Ben Barkley along the entrance trail near the kiosk. Seen only on the ground; short primary projection, with p10 obviously shorter than p9 which was easily visible when viewing the inside of left wing; significant buff spotting on primaries; outer end of what was visible of the white-ish/buffy wing bar appeared to be just short of, or about level with, the end of tertials; overall a buffy, stocky looking Nighthawk. Aside from a few minor adjustments it only moved when a chipmunk nearly ran into it, which happened 3 times, and when it defecated, at which point it slowly shuffled in a nearly perfect 90-degree turn, took care of business, then slowly shuffled back to its original position.

Update 5/27/17: Jeff received word early on the morning of May 27 from Robert Blair of The Raptor Trust that a Lesser Nighthawk was released at the Raptor Trust this past Sunday, May 21. It was originally found in Hillsborough Twp. (Somerset County) on May 14. There were no apparent injuries; It was thin but not emaciated; it was tube fed, given insects, and was test flown and deemed ready for release after a week. Pictures taken by The Raptor Trust leave no doubt to the ID of this bird. The Raptor Trust is roughly one mile from Lord Stirling Park.

Update 5/27/17: The Lesser Nighthawk was actually found on Thursday, May 11, in a front yard on Steele Place in Hillsborough Twp. where it was picked up by St. Hubert’s Animal Welfare Center (Madison, NJ) and brought to The Raptor Trust. Thanks again to Robert Blair for the original info from early this morning regarding this bird and this new info with a corrected date and more precise original location.


Other Birds

Cedar Waxwing, Lord Stirling Park, NJ, May 27, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Large groups of Cedar Waxwings have invaded northern New Jersey, usually a good indication that the bulk of spring migration is nearly finished, but migrants can still be found.

A Gray-cheeked Thrush was seen May 26 at the Great Swamp NWR.

Gray-cheeked Thrush, Great Swamp NWR, NJ, May 27, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Birdcast’s Midwest and Northeast forecast for the rest of this week is here.


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


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Lesser Nighthawk at Lord Stirling Park Update – May 27, 2017

By now many readers may have learned of yesterday’s (May 26) exciting find of a Lesser Nighthawk at Lord Stirling Park in Bernards Township. That post is here.

Jeff Ellerbusch of Warren Township received a message from The Raptor Trust earlier today which he relayed to the birding community. His message is reproduced here:

“All, I received word early this morning from Robert Blair that a Lesser Nighthawk was released at The Raptor Trust this past Sunday, May 21. It was originally found in Hillsborough Twp. on May 14. There were no apparent injuries; It was thin but not emaciated; it was tube fed, given insects, and was test flown and deemed ready for release after a week. I received pics, including a spread wing shot, from Robert and there is no doubt to the ID of The Raptor Trust bird. The Raptor Trust is roughly one mile from Lord Stirling Park.”


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


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Lesser Nighthawk at Lord Stirling Park, Somerset County – May 26, 2017

Ben Barkley made a stunning find today along the main path near the Environmental Education Center at Lord Stirling Park in Bernards Township. What was first thought to be a possibly injured Common Nighthawk turned into a resting Lesser Nighthawk (Chordeiles acutipennis).

To show how out of place this species is in North New Jersey and anywhere else in eastern North America, here is the distribution map of Lesser Nighthawk in North and Central America, courtesy of Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology’s Birds of North America.

Outside of Florida, records are nearly non-existent in the east with the only viable record from the northeast being the Lesser Nighthawk at Cape May in November, 2007. Is this species easily overlooked? Probably.

As of dusk this evening, Ben reports the Lesser Nighthawk was flying around Esox Pond and Branta Pond at Lord Stirling Park. The Lesser Nighthawk is apparently doing well.

A crucial difference in the flight appearance of Common (CONI) and Lesser Nighthawks (LENI) other than LENI is slightly smaller, is the placement of the vertical white patch on the wing. For LENI, it is closer to the tip of the wing, roughly two-thirds towards the tip. This may seem slight but it is noticeable. Ben has a photo showing this quite well.

As stated in Birds of North America: “The outermost (10th) primary of Lesser Nighthawk is shorter than the 9th, resulting in a wing that appears more rounded than that of Common Nighthawk.”

The coloring is also noticeably different in resting birds with the LENI having much buff coloring.

Here is the LENI at rest on the path at Lord Stirling Park late today. Click on the photo for a larger image.

Lesser Nighthawk, Lord Stirling Park, Somerset Co., NJ, May 26, 2017 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

For comparison, here is a Common Nighthawk photographed at Troy Meadows by Chuck Hantis on May 14.

Common Nighthawk, Troy Meadows, NJ, May 14, 2017 (photo by Chuck Hantis)

Congratulations to Ben for a spectacular find and for the presence of mind to ascertain the correct identification of the bird.

Note to eBirders: This is a New Jersey review species and as such will be submitted to the New Jersey Bird Record Committee for acceptance as the second state record. It will be validated (reviewer parlance), or confirmed (end user term), by this eBird reviewer but will be categorized as “In Review by BRC” until a decision is made by the NJBRC. Also, please give descriptions of what was seen in your comments. Avoid the perfunctory and meaningless “Continuing Bird” comment.


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


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Posted in Morris County, Somerset County | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Bird Migration Radar – May 17, 2017

Nothing to say, really. This simply means birds! This may be the most intense migration of the season.

Here is a larger sampling.


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird’s Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


The mocosocoBirds Facebook page is located here and also posts timely information not found on the mocosocoBirds web site.

@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


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