Weekend Bird Notes – Sep. 12, 2015

Lincoln's Sparrow, Morris Twp., NJ, Sep. 12, 2015 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Lincoln’s Sparrow, Morris Twp., NJ, Sep. 12, 2015 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

The old Sayre’s Farm in Washington Valley, Morris Township had the first Lincoln’s Sparrow of the season along with Swainson’s Thrush and a meager amount of other migrants. So far, the fall migration is as underwhelming as the spring migration was. The Lincoln’s Sparrow is actually the first report in New Jersey and the surrounding region this season, according to eBird data.

A continuing White-eyed Vireo was singing along the west path of the Moody Farm in Morris Twp.

Swainson's Thrush, Morris Twp., NJ, Sep. 12, 2015 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)

Swainson’s Thrush, Morris Twp., NJ, Sep. 12, 2015 (photo by Jonathan Klizas)


9 warbler species, including Cape May and Tennessee Warblers, along with Swainson’s Thrush were at Chimney Rock this morning (Jeff Ellerbusch, Simon Lane).


An immature Little Blue Heron was at Colonial Park, Sept. 11 (Mike Russell). This is only the second record for Somerset County in 2015. There are none for Morris.


A juvenile Purple Finch visited a feeder in Hillsborough, Sept. 11 (Bobby Skrabal).


Mt. Hope Lake, Rockaway Twp. Sep. 11 (Dan Brill): 2 Bald Eagles, 2 Blue-winged Teal, 3 Great Egrets.


On Sept. 7, both a Philadelphia Vireo and Red-headed Woodpecker were seen and photographed at the East Observation Tower at Lord Stirling Park (Jason Denesevich).

Red-headed Woodpecker, Lord Stirling Park, NJ, Sep. 7, 2015 (photo by Jason Denesevich)

Red-headed Woodpecker, Lord Stirling Park, NJ, Sep. 7, 2015 (photo by Jason Denesevich)


The End of the Selody Plover Story

Labor Day weekend saw a surge of excitement over a possible Pacific Golden-Plover at Selody Sod Farm in Montgomery Twp.

Put it to rest.

The shorebird in question is a juvenile American Golden-Plover. Photos were examined.  Kevin Karlson also viewed photos and was adamant about the correct identification. Situations like these are always educational and birders should take away the learning experience with a positive outlook.


mocosocoBirds in the future

Some readers may have noticed a drop in the number of mocosocoBirds posts recently. mocosocoBirds is not going away, but the frequency of posting is changing. The blog is always evolving as those who have followed it for four-and-a-half years and 1,812 posts may notice. It will probably happen that posts are reduced to one or two a week, or less, in the future.  The author has many interests that need attention and there are only so many hours in the day.

Keep birding! And keep reporting!

Hopefully, we will meet in the field.

Jonathan Klizas


View local eBird checklists in the mocosocoBirds region via eBird Region Explorer. Use the following links:

The eBird Hotspot Primer is here and can also be accessed via the Hotspot menu item on the mocosocoBirds.com website.


@mocosocoBirds at Twitter is another communications stream. Instant field reports and links of interest are tweeted throughout the day. The latest tweets appear on the sidebar of this page. One can follow mocosocoBirds at Twitter or link to @mocosocoBirds.


Finis


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